Anonymous Now: Million Mask March descends on London

The million mask march in London, England, is tomorrow . . .  -LW


Published time: November 04, 2014 15:23

Reuters/Andrew Winning

Reuters/Andrew Winning

 Organized by the global hacktivist group Anonymous, the London protest will march from Trafalgar Square and finish at the Houses of Parliament.The Million Mask March will course through London on Wednesday November 5. The march, in which all demonstrators obscure their faces to protect their identity, is in protest against austerity, mass surveillance and attacks on human rights.

It is unknown how many demonstrators will join the march, as pleas from police for information have remained unanswered.

In 2013 the event gathered crowds of more than 2,500. The Facebook event suggests over 6,000 people may attend this year.

AFP Photo/Will Oliver

AFP Photo/Will Oliver

Speaking to RT, an Anonymous source said the Million Mask March, a tradition began in 2011, was originally called OpVendetta, and initially only gathered a crowd of 50.

Within a year, the following had grown to 2,000, and in 2013 the decision was made to rename the march the “Million Mask March,” the source said.

In 2013, there were over 400 Anonymous demonstrations worldwide, held to coincide with the annual British tradition of Bonfire Night of November 5, the date on which a group of dissident plotters tried to blow up parliament in 1605. Attendants often wear a Guy Fawkes mask, made famous by the 2005 film V for Vendetta, which has become the group’s trademark disguise.

The global protests took place last year in various world cities including Vancouver, Tel Aviv, Dublin, Paris, Chicago and Sydney.

RT’s Anonymous source said: “It’s a night of grievance on a night that’s historically about parliament and how it’s not always working in the people’s interests.”

“We burn an effigy of Guy Fawkes on a fire each year as a warning against standing against parliament so we just felt it would be symbolic,” they added.

In the lead up to the march, Anonymous sent a direct message to global bodies of power.

“To oppressive governments, we say this: we do not expect our campaign to be completed in a short time frame. However, you will not prevail against the angry masses of the body politic.”

The message further addresses the British government, saying they have “made an enemy of Anonymous,” and that they have “angered them considerably.”

This annual protest against austerity comes after a wave of protests and strikes swept through the UK during September and October.

On October 12, National Health Service (NHS) workers staged a strike over an ongoing pay dispute. The four hour strike marked the first time in history in which nurses have taken strike action.

Three days later, on October 15, the Public Commercial Services union (PCS) walked out over a 1 percent pay rise cap – a pay cut in real terms. Some 200,000 public sector workers walked out for 24 hours, causing nationwide disruption to job centers, museums and courts.

More recently, police are alleged to have employed excessive violence against Occupy Democracy protesters in Parliament Square, forcibly removing tarpaulins and belongings and making over 40 arrests.

The Metropolitan Police say they wish to engage with Anonymous so they can“work together to ensure they can protest safely.”

Chief Superintendent Pippa Mills said they are trying to contact Anonymous, but“no one has come forward.”

“We are keen to talk with them to ensure they are able to protest; it is important that they talk to us so that we can work together to achieve a safe and successful event.”

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Peacekeeper: An Alternative to Calling the Police

Would you use this app? -LW


Connect with neighbors for a less militant response during times of need.

PEACEKEEPER APP

PEACEKEEPER APP

As difficult as it may be to acknowledge, the unfortunate truth is that we are in a place today where domestic police brutality has taken a dramatic toll on innocent lives. Another casualty of the inflated police aggression is the well-based distrust of the law enforcement system. Taking true stock of the situation, we see that deaths of Americans at the hands of American police officers has surpassed deaths of American soldiers in the Iraq war in part, because our police force is overly militarized. Our distrust is a measured response to a real problem.

These frequent and increasing incidents of government brutality, such as Kelly ThomasLuis RodriguezJustina Pelletier to name only a few, prove that police presence, even in response to a crime, is often a great risk factor for assault and even death. The stories are endless, the facts, wrenching.

People can justify all sorts of cruelties—for many, legality equates to morality. But, as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. so aptly points out in his letters, “Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal.” The working cultural assumption is that the justice system serves everyone equally. That theory has repeatedly proven false with incarceration levels here higher than any other country and more blacks imprisoned now than during the time of the Jim Crow laws.

To those who think that our police are heroes who protect the safety and the lives of your family, look around you and ask the hard questions. At what point does the“collateral damage” become too great to bear? When it is your beloved pet or beloved child dying? Or when you become the victim of a truly unaccountable system?

In a country fraught with this increasing police brutality and long response times, emerging technologies promise a viable antidote to the rampant and escalating abuse of power.

Cell phone apps have swept the world with solutions to everyday problems, providing connectivity to seemingly disparate populations. One new app offers a promise of peace in contrast to the incessant violence associated with institutionalized law enforcement.

The “Peacekeeper” app does this through a principled vision and clever approach. The app connects community members directly to each other fostering community interdependence by empowering community members to protect each other.

Imagine, instead of making a call to a law enforcement agency that is most likely overworked and far away and certainly trained to respond violently, you press the button on your phone and your previously chosen neighbors will be alerted that you are in danger. They will be able to respond immediately given their proximity to the situation.

The app’s strength is in the geographic proximity, and hence immediacy, of the responders. This provides a keen solution to in-home invasion or any property/personal crimes committed at a physical address associated with the app. In the near future, once the app is widely adopted, this will be a powerful deterrent to criminals knowing that the response team is geographically close to the point of potential crime. Victims of crime will not have to wonder if the responders will treat them as the criminals. They will choose their own responders based on who they trust.

While there are still a few wrinkles to work out and wide adoption is needed in order for this to have maximum benefit, the vision and potential for this app are unparalleled. This truly creates the setting where a law enforcement agency is not needed and not desired.

The app is available now to Iphone users (in Beta version now which is free) and by the end of May for Android users. Additional functions of the app are still in development. The founders are committed to seeing improvements that allow for crime response and crime protection anywhere you go. At $30 per year, the app is the best way to peacefully protect yourself and your community.

An added, but not primary, benefit of the app is its ability to assist victims of government brutality. With the increasing level of government raids–many of these raids against small farmers and other property owners–this app proves to be the best possible solution for wide dissemination of information related to government aggression. The same functions that allow you to alert your neighbors of a home invasion will also alert them of government agents beginning a raid on your farm or property. Close neighbors, or those on the list to alert, will be notified and have the chance to witness and film an encounter with police or regulators.

The app has two levels of notifications. The first level is to notify close neighbors who are committed to respond in moments to a reported “incident.” A secondary list of “allies” alerts a wider distribution of friends and family about any crime or aggression. This gives them the opportunity to get the word out quickly about any incident whether it is a property crime or government raid. The dual purpose and benefits of this app are clear.

The vision of the Peacekeeper app is beautiful. It is a vision of people coming together to bring us to a free and peaceful future by replacing the monopoly that is the police force and the need to rely on such a force. The app does this in a way that nourishes and fosters community involvement and true neighbor-to-neighbor interdependence where peace and liberty can thrive.

A system that continuously brutalizes peaceful people, will, inevitably, result in the rampant cruelty we have witnessed. Conversely, opting out of a failing system and supporting a workable solution, allows for the opportunity to create a new future.

Get the app. Sign up your neighbors. Use it. Spread it. We have a free future ahead of us. Let’s find each other now.

{ Support Police State USA }

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American shakedown: Police won’t charge you, but they’ll grab your money

U.S. police are operating a co-ordinated scheme to seize as much of the public’s cash as they can

By Neil Macdonald, CBC News Posted: Sep 11, 2014 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Sep 11, 2014 5:00 AM ET

In the U.S., a cash-grab by police and government is dressed up in terms like “interdiction and forfeiture,” or “the equitable sharing program.” (CBC)

On its official website, the Canadian government informs its citizens that “there is no limit to the amount of money that you may legally take into or out of the United States.” Nonetheless, it adds, banking in the U.S. can be difficult for non-residents, so Canadians shouldn’t carry large amounts of cash.

That last bit is excellent advice, but for an entirely different reason than the one Ottawa cites.

There’s a shakedown going on in the U.S., and the perps are in uniform.

Across America, law enforcement officers — from federal agents to state troopers right down to sheriffs in one-street backwaters — are operating a vast, co-ordinated scheme to grab as much of the public’s cash as they can; “hand over fist,” to use the words of one police trainer.

Roadside seizure

It usually starts on the road somewhere. An officer pulls you over for some minor infraction — changing lanes without proper signalling, following the car ahead too closely, straddling lanes. The offence is irrelevant.

Then the police officer wants to chat, asking questions about where you’re going, or where you came from, and why. He’ll peer into your car, then perhaps ask permission to search it, citing the need for vigilance against terrorist weaponry or drugs.

What he’s really looking for, though, is money.

And if you were foolish (or intimidated) enough to have consented to the search, and you’re carrying any significant amount of cash, you are now likely to lose it.

The officer will probably produce a waiver, saying that if you just sign over the money then the whole matter will just disappear, and you’ll be able to go on your way.

Refuse to sign it, and he may take the cash anyway, proclaiming it the probable proceeds of drugs or some other crime.

Either way, you almost certainly won’t be charged with anything; the objective is to take your money, not burden the system.

You’ll have the right to seek its return in court, but of course that will mean big lawyer’s fees, and legally documenting exactly where the money came from. You will need to prove you are not a drug dealer or a terrorist.

It might take a year or two. And several trips back to the jurisdiction where you were pulled over. Sorry.

In places like Tijuana, police don’t make any pretense about this sort of thing. Here in the U.S., though, it’s dressed up in terms like “interdiction and forfeiture,” or “the equitable sharing program.”

Authorities claim it’s legal, but some prosecutors and judges have called it what it is: abuse.

In any case, it’s a nasty American reality.

Powers and justifications

Seizing suspected drug money has been legal here for decades, but after 9/11 police acquired a whole new set of powers and justifications. And they set about using them for profit.

‘The Washington Post this week reported that in the past 13 years, there have been 61,998 cash seizures on roadways and elsewhere without use of search warrants. The total haul: $2.5 billion.’

The total haul: $2.5 billion, divided pretty much equally between the U.S. government and state and local authorities (hence the Kafkaesque “equitable sharing” euphemism).

Half of the seizures, according to the Post, were below $8,800. Only a sixth of those who had money taken from them pursued its return.

Some, no doubt, were indeed drug dealers or money launderers and just walked away from the money. Others just couldn’t spare the expense and time of going to court.

Of those who did, though, nearly half got their money back, a statistic that fairly screams about the legitimacy of the seizures.

So does another fact: In many cases, authorities offer half the money back – money they’d claimed was proceeds of crime. And when they do issue a cheque, they almost always insist their victim sign a legal release promising never to sue.

It would also appear police like to target minorities, who tend to be cooperative and less likely to hire a lawyer.

Civil rights advocates have documented all sorts of outright legal theft:

  • The (minority) businessman from Georgia who was relieved of $75,000 he’d raised from relatives to buy a restaurant in Louisiana.
  • The (minority) church leaders who were carrying nearly $30,000 from their Baltimore parishioners to carry out church activities in North Carolina and El Salvador.
  • The young college grad with no criminal record on his way to a job interview out West who was relieved of $2,500 lent to him by his dad for the trip.

News outlets here have reported many such abuses over the years. But the Washington Post’s latest investigation exposes money-grabbing as big business.

It involves a nationwide network of enforcement agencies (except in the few states that have banned it) that operates with the help of a vast private intelligence service called “Black Asphalt” (police forces pay an enrolment fee of $19.95). The network uses consultants and trainers who either charge fees or operate on contingency, keeping a percentage of cash seized by their police pupils.

Police forces use the money to finance their departmental budgets, sometimes spending it on luxury vehicles, first-class tickets to conferences, and lavish quarters. They regard the money as rightfully theirs. One prosecutor used seized cash to defend herself against a lawsuit brought by people whose cash she seized.

It’s just human nature, really.

Give police the legal ability to take someone’s money, and to claim it’s in the national interest, and then tell them they can keep a nice chunk of it, and what other result could there be?

Travel advice

So, for any law-abiding Canadian thinking about an American road trip, here’s some non-official advice:

Avoid long chats if you’re pulled over. Answer questions politely and concisely, then persistently ask if you are free to go.

Don’t leave litter on the vehicle floor, especially energy drink cans.

Don’t use air or breath fresheners; they could be interpreted as an attempt to mask the smell of drugs.

Don’t be too talkative. Don’t be too quiet. Try not to wear expensive designer clothes. Don’t have tinted windows.

And for heaven’s sake, don’t consent to a search if you are carrying a big roll of legitimate cash.

As the Canadian government notes, there is no law against carrying it here or any legal limit on how much you can carry. But if you’re on an American roadway with a full wallet, in the eyes of thousands of cash-hungry cops you’re a rolling ATM.

Evil Conservative Radio: What Power Does the Common-Law Grand Jury Hold?

If you’ve heard of Common Law Grand Juries, but aren’t quite sure what they are or why we don’t hear about them (much) anymore, this article should help. -LW

Guy Blouin ID’d as cyclist run over by Quebec City police car – Next Ferguson?

Thanks, Dmitra!

A cross made of a two-by-four and flowers laid on the ground are the only clues that cyclist Guy Blouin died after being run over by a Quebec City police cruiser yesterday.

The 48-year-old man was hit around 1 p.m. ET Wednesday at the corner of St-François East and Du Parvis streets. He died in hospital several hours later.

Witnesses to the incident said Blouin was biking the wrong way down the street when a police car moved to intercept him. They said they saw the cruiser back up over the cyclist.

“They ran over the guy, the guy ended up under the car. For an entire 15 seconds; he was under the tire in a fetal position,” Alexandre Beaulieu told Radio-Canada.

Because the case involves local police, the provincial police, SûretéduQuébec, was called in to investigate.
The Quebec City police department issued a statement late Thursday morning saying the force and the officers involved are co-operating with the SQ’s investigation.

Witness accounts

Beaulieu said he saw the officers get out of the car, saw the man caught under the wheels, then get back into the patrol car and roll over the victim a second time. Other witnesses corroborated his account.

Another witness, who gave his name as Daniel, said he heard police tell the cyclist that he was under arrest. “He was spitting blood,” the witness said.

Another witness said officers helped Blouin to his feet and put him in the ambulance without putting him on a stretcher first.
Paramedic supervisor Jean-François Roy said the man’s condition worsened during the ride to l’Enfant Jésus Hospital.

Provincial police investigate

​ Sgt. Ann Mathieu of the SQ would not confirm the witness accounts, but said that investigators are considering them as possible hypotheses.

Provincial police will also look into the fact that the patrol car and the bicycle were moved from the scene.

The officers under investigation picked up the bike and put it in the trunk of their car, and later put it back at the scene.

Mathieu said the officers involved and as many witnesses as possible will be interviewed by investigators.

The witnesses Radio-Canada spoke to had seen the man in the neighbourhood before, but did not know him.

Quebec City residents hold vigil

​More than 200 people gathered in front of St-Roch Church in downtown Quebec City at 5 p.m. to hold a vigil in honour of Guy Blouin.

The crowd of adults, children and cyclists held a minute of silence on the church steps and sang a song in his memory.
A book of condolences was also set up for his family.

Some demonstrators at the vigil handed out flyers that read: Thieves: Police are stealing lives.

No police officers were present at the vigil, which remained peaceful.

Another vigil is scheduled for Friday at 1 p.m. — 48 hours after the incident happened.

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VIDEO American Delusion: Distracted, Diverted and Insulated from the Grim Reality of the Police State

(The video is at the bottom of the article)

obama-sunglassesSeptember 03, 2014 By John W. Whitehead

“In the age of advanced technology, spiritual devastation is more likely to come from an enemy with a smiling face than from one whose countenance exudes suspicion and hate. In the Huxleyan prophecy, Big Brother does not watch us, by his choice. We watch him, by ours. There is no need for wardens or gates or Ministries of Truth. When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk: culture-death is a clear possibility.”—Author Neil Postman

Caught up in the uproar over this year’s latest hullabaloo—militarized police in Ferguson, tanks on Main Street and ISIS—Americans have not only largely forgotten last year’s hullabaloo over the NSA and government surveillance but are generally foggy about everything that has happened in between.

Then again, so much has happened in the year since Edward Snowden first appeared on the national scene that it’s understandable if the average American has a hard time keeping up with and remembering all of the “events,” manufactured or otherwise, which occur like clockwork and keep us distracted, deluded, amused, and insulated from the reality of the American police state.

This is not to say that many of these events are not critical or important. However, when we’re being bombarded with wall-to-wall news coverage and news cycles that change every few days, it’s difficult to stay focused on one thing—namely, holding the government accountable to abiding by the rule of law—and the powers-that-be understand this.

In fact, Professor Jacques Ellul studied this phenomenon of overwhelming news, short memories and the use of propaganda to advance hidden agendas. “One thought drives away another; old facts are chased by new ones,” wrote Ellul.

Under these conditions there can be no thought. And, in fact, modern man does not think about current problems; he feels them. He reacts, but he does not understand them any more than he takes responsibility for them. He is even less capable of spotting any inconsistency between successive facts; man’s capacity to forget is unlimited. This is one of the most important and useful points for the propagandists, who can always be sure that a particular propaganda theme, statement, or event will be forgotten within a few weeks.”

Consider if you will the regularly scheduled trivia and/or distractions that have kept us tuned into the various breaking news headlines and entertainment spectacles and tuned out to the government’s steady encroachments on our freedoms:

In late August / early September, we were treated to Justin Bieber’s run-in with police after a bout of reckless driving, the FBI’s investigation into the leaking of celebrities’ nude photos, Brad and Angelina’s wedding, James Foley’s carefully staged beheading, Robin Williams’ unfortunate suicide, the riots in Ferguson over the police shooting of an unarmed black man, growing threats from ISIS, and the ALS ice bucket challenge sensation.

That was preceded by reports of immigrant children flooding over the border, Israel and Hamas’ on-again, off-again fighting, Germany’s victory in the World Cup, Ebola breakouts in West Africa, the Malaysian Airlines passenger jet crash in Ukraine, the exchange by the U.S. of five Taliban prisoners for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the growing legalization of same-sex marriage by the states, and the kidnapping of 280 Nigerian girls for use as sex slaves.

Before that, there was the shooting rampage by an Iraq war veteran at the Fort Hood Army base, the uproar over LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling’s racist remarks, the Veterans Administration’s failure to provide timely care to vets, Russia and the U.S. in a tug of war over control of Crimea, the disappearance of a Malaysia Airlines flight—this one en route to China, the 2014 Winter Olympics hosted by Russia, the Seattle Seahawks’ first ever win at the Super Bowl, Gov. Chris Christie’s role in the George Washington Bridge lane closings scandal, and the outpouring of tributes over the death of Nelson Mandela.

No less traumatic and distracting were the preceding months’ newsworthy events, which included a devastating typhoon in the Philippines, France and Germany’s displeasure over the NSA spying on its people and leaders, the U.S. government’s 16-day shutdown over Obamacare, public opposition to President Obama’s plans to take military action against Syria over its alleged use of chemical weapons, another shooting rampage—this time at the Washington Navy Yard, Russia’s granting of asylum to Edward Snowden, Bradley Manning’s announcement that he is in fact Chelsea Manning, which came a day after he was sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking classified documents, the birth of a new prince to British royals William and Kate, George Zimmerman’s acquittal of murdering Trayvon Martin, the Supreme Court’s striking down of the Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional, and Edward Snowden’s leaking the first of what would turn into a more-than-yearlong series of revelations about the government’s illegal surveillance programs.

As I point out in my book A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State, these sleight-of-hand distractions and diversions are how you control a population, either inadvertently or intentionally, advancing your agenda without much opposition from the citizenry. But what exactly has the government been doing while we’ve been so cooperatively fixated on whatever current sensation happens to be monopolizing the mainstream “news” shows?

If properly disclosed and consistently reported on, the sheer volume of the government’s activities, which undermine the Constitution and dance close to the edge of outright illegality, would inevitably give rise to a sea change in how business is conducted in our seats of power.

Surely Americans would be outraged over the government’s plan to turn our most casual statements into hate crimes using Truthy, a $1 million online database being created to track “misinformation” and hate speech on Twitter, as well as “detect political smears, astroturfing, misinformation, and other social pollution.” Or that the Pentagon is spending millions to find ways to put down social unrest, starting with lawful First Amendment free speech protests.

There would be no end to the uproar if Americans understood the origins of ISIS, the latest hobgoblin in the government’s war on terror, whose funding appears to track back to the CIA, which helped fund its guerilla tactics in Syria.

Parents would be livid if they had any inkling about the school-to-prison pipeline, namely, how the public schools are being transformed from institutions of learning to prison-like factories, complete with armed police and surveillance cameras, aimed at churning out compliant test-takers rather than independent-minded citizens.

Taxpayers would be up in arms over the government’s end-run tactics to avoid abiding by the rule of law, whether by outsourcing illegal surveillance activities to defense contractors or outsourcing inhumane torture to foreign countries.

And one would hope American citizens would be incensed about being treated like prisoners in an electronic concentration camp, their every movement monitored, tracked and recorded by a growing government surveillance network that runs the gamut from traffic cameras and police body cameras to facial recognition software and the armed surveillance drones that will soon blanket American skies.

Unfortunately, while much of this information can be discovered through a focused study of alternative media reports, it does require quite a bit of digging and even more determination on the part of the citizenry to take an active role in their governance—which, of course, is the key to maintaining freedom.

Professor Morris Berman suggests that the problems plaguing us as a nation—particularly as they relate to the government—have less to do with our inattention to corruption than our sanctioning, tacit or not, of such activities. “It seems to me,” writes Berman, “that the people do get the government they deserve, and even beyond that, the government who they are, so to speak. In that regard, we might consider, as an extreme version of this… that Hitler was as much an expression of the German people at that point in time as he was a departure from them.”

So where does that leave us?

As legendary television journalist Edward R. Murrow warned, “Unless we get up off our fat surpluses and recognize that television in the main is being used to distract, delude, amuse, and insulate us, then television and those who finance it, those who look at it, and those who work at it, may see a totally different picture too late.”

Filmmaker John Carpenter delivers this same warning in his film They Live, in which a deluded, blinded, indoctrinated, enslaved populace finds that the only way to break free of their oppressors is by donning a pair of special Hoffman sunglasses. Only then are they able to see clearly and distinguish between what is real and what is a carefully fabricated and expansive lie designed to keep them sated, satisfied, distracted and in the dark.

If we do not awaken to the truth and open our eyes soon, then we may well find ourselves staring at a far different, far less pleasant picture before long, and by then, it will be too late to alter our reality.

Time to don a pair of Hoffman sunglasses?

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After two cops attempted to enter his home without a warrant, Avel Amarel stands up for his rights and sends them away

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police-state

the-marxist-brothers

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