Breaking: Pentagon Review Says America’s Nukes Are FUBAR

Is this the cover story for getting rid of nukes that the galactics have disabled?


The guys babysitting our missiles in Montana couldn’t agree more.

—By 


Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is ordering a massive overhaul of America’s nuclear weapons program after finding it to be plagued with “fundamental flaws,” the AP reported this evening. Pentagon-commissioned reviews of the nuclear forces have found outdated equipment, weak leadership, and abysmal morale among the men and women responsible for maintaining and launching some of the most destructive weapons on the planet. Many of the problems were already well known, but the language the Pentagon is using to describe them is uncharacteristically strong. “Hagel’s reviews concluded that the structure of US nuclear weapons forces is so incoherent that it cannot be properly managed,” noted the AP, which got a briefing on the highlights from two senior defense officials.

“Nothing the Air Force is doing is going to reduce the risk. It’s not missileers who are at fault, it’s the mission.”

The latest review, which was expected to be released this week, was conducted by Retired General James Welch, a former top nuclear commander whom the Pentagon has tapped repeatedly to assess problems with its nuclear oversight. In 2007, Welch led the initial outside review of what remains the worst nuclear weapons scandal in recent years: Six nuclear missiles went missing for 36 hours after a crew at Minot Air Force Base mistakenly loaded them onto a plane and flew them across the country. (See our timeline: “That Time We Almost Nuked North Carolina.”) Welch later directed two follow-up assessments in April 2011 and April 2013, the last of which noted improvements and concluded that “the nuclear force is professional, disciplined, committed and attentive to the special demands of the mission.”

But that conclusion was quickly called into question by a string of new scandals, as detailed in “Death Wears Bunny Slippers,” my recent feature story about the ICBM program. In the months following Welch’s review, 98 missileers were implicated in a cheating scandal and nine midlevel commanders were fired; a leaked email from the commander of the nuclear missile wing at North Dakota’s Minot Air Force base complained of “rot” in the missile force; and Gen. Michael Carey was removed as commander of the ICBM program after an official trip to Russia, where he engaged in “inappropriate behavior,” including heavy drinking, rudeness to his hosts, and associating with “suspect” women. Just last week, the Air Force fired two high-level commanders in the ICBM program and disciplined a third for various leadership lapses, including the maltreatment of subordinates.

Welch has since distanced himself from last year’s rosy assessment. His spokesman told the AP that the 2013 report was addressing organizational aspects of the nuclear mission and not primarily personnel and attitude issues.

The Air Force has long struggled to create a balance between strong oversight of missileers and the need to create a rewarding work environment that attracts talented recruits. Following the 2007 missing-nukes scandal, the Air Force instituted a regimen of strict tests and inspections that “was as much punishment as it was rigor,” Lt. General Stanley Kowalski, now the Deputy Commander of US Strategic Command, said at the time. In a follow-up report three years later, Welch suggested that the strategy had backfired by sowing mistrust and creating a sense of “nuclear paranoia”—talented airmen were avoiding nuclear weapons jobs.

According to the AP, Hagel will seek to invest an additional $1 to $10 billion in the nuclear program and promote its top commanders to give the nuclear wing more clout within the Air Force bureaucracy.

During my reporting for “Death Wears Bunny Slippers,” I interviewed a slew of nuclear policy experts and traveled to Great Falls, Montana—home to Malmstrom Air Force Base—where I spent time with current and former missileers. They told me of the mind-numbing boredom of babysitting ICBMs for 24 hours straight, of cheating on proficiency tests, of how one colonel made them shit in a box because he didn’t want to take the missiles offline to fix the toilets. They were basically dying to get the hell out.

The consensus among the experts was that no amount of funding or attention will be enough to fix the ICBM program’s biggest problem: obsolescence. “I am deeply disappointed with the happy talk coming out of the Air Force and Department of Defense on this,” Joseph Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund, a foundation focused on nuclear weapons policy, told me. (Disclosure: Ploughshares has provided some funding for Mother Jones’ national security reporting.) “These missileers are in dead-end jobs and they know it. They pull 24-hour shifts underground waiting to push a button that they know they are never going to push, and if they did, they would be condemning hundreds of thousands of civilians to death. What kind of job is that? New helicopters and new managers are not going to fix this problem. Nothing the Air Force is doing is going to reduce the risk. It’s not missileers who are at fault, it’s the mission.”

Source.

‘Aliens’ Messed with U.S. and Soviet Nukes Say US Airmen

In the midst of the Cold War on several occasions, nuclear missiles at US Air Force bases were mysteriously shut down, according to US servicemen who said they witnessed the failure of the heavily guarded missile systems.

But they don’t blame America’s Cold War enemy, the Soviet Union; they say aliens from space did it.

“This was something Russia could have developed, but it turns out they didn’t develop this and we don’t have it either – to be able to shut down nuclear weapons with a beam of light,” David Scott, a former sergeant in the US Air Force, told RIA Novosti at a conference in Washington on encounters with extraterrestrials.

‘Aliens’ Messed with US, Soviet Nukes – US Airmen

Scott and three retired Air Force officers told a panel of six former members of the US Congress at the conference about their experiences with extraterrestrial “visitors” who meddled with US nuclear weapons systems.

The five-day conference, called the Citizen Hearing on Disclosure, is sponsored by the UFO truth organization Paradigm Research Group and is being held in the style of Congressional hearings, with time limits for witness testimony, question and answer sessions with former members of Congress, and statements entered into the record.

About 40 international researchers, military and scientific witnesses are scheduled to testify during the conference, with some providing what they say is evidence of an alien presence on Earth. The former lawmakers listening to the testimony are each being paid $20,000 to attend the five days of hearings.

© Karin Zeitvogel   Former US Air Force Capt. David Schindele spoke out
for the first time about his UFO experiences in the 1960s

Speaking for the first time ever about his experiences some 50 years ago with extra-terrestrials, retired Air Force Capt. David Schindele told how, in the 1960s, what he is convinced were aliens knocked “all missiles” at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota “off-alert,” making them “unlaunchable.”

“We had no doubt that the 10 nuclear-tipped missiles had been compromised, tampered with and put out of commission by the ‘object’ that had paid a visit” the night before, an emotional Schindele told the panel of former lawmakers.

Retired Air Force Captain Robert Salas told of an incident at an air force base in Montana in 1967, where nuclear missiles “were shut down as a UFO was seen overhead.”

While aliens were allegedly shutting down nuclear weapons systems in the United States, in the Soviet Union, in 1982, they are suspected of initiating launch procedures for nuclear warheads, sending Soviet troops scrambling to undo the extraterrestrial move, witnesses told the former lawmakers.

Funding for the conference is being provided by Canadian “philanthropist, futurist and visionary Thomas Clearwater,” Stephen Bassett, executive director of the Paradigm Research Group, told RIA Novosti.

US airmen, who claim they saw UFOs were forced to sign oaths of secrecy, forget they ever saw anything, and were ridiculed by their peers and superior officers when they reported UFO sightings, the witnesses told the panel.

Salas wrote a book in 2005, “Faded Giant,” about the Montana air force base UFO event, which spurred many of the other panelists to finally speak in public about their experiences with what they say were extraterrestrials.

In the Soviet Union, meanwhile, those who reported seeing UFOs were treated entirely differently, historian and UFO author Richard Dolan testified, citing a case in 1990, “which involved an unbelievable encounter by an object that was playing all sorts of games with the Soviet interceptor that was seen by multiple of witnesses.”

Following the encounter, “the Soviet minister of defense spoke about it, the Soviet top general for air defense spoke about it,” Dolan said.

And like the US airmen, the Soviet top brass did not blame their Cold War rivals, the Americans, but pinned the blame for the incident on extraterrestrial visitors, Dolan added.

“The top Soviet commander said, ‘There is no way we were going to attack this. It was vastly beyond anything that we or anyone we know had,’” Dolan said, adding that Soviet military “discounted that this was American — not a chance.”

One of the former lawmakers on the panel was overheard by RIA Novosti as saying the conference was a first step toward holding a real Congressional hearing on UFOs.

“It clearly warrants a congressional hearing but that would violate the ‘truth embargo,’ which is the name I’ve given to the policy of the government to withhold acknowledgement and information of an extraterrestrial presence,” said Bassett of the Paradigm Research Group.

Source