​Quantum leap forward: China to launch world’s longest, ‘hack-proof’ network by 2016

Is this why Russia’s Internet traffic is running through China?  -LW


AFP Photo/Str

AFP Photo/Str

China is completing the project of the planet’s longest, 2,000-kilometer quantum communication network from Beijing to Shanghai. The network is considered “unhackable” and is set to start operating in 2016.

The “unhackability” is due to the most secure encryption technology ever, the South China Morning Post reported.

By 2030, the network is expected to stretch all over the globe, Xinhua news agency said.

For now, the service is to be used by the Chinese government, the military and key business institutions such as banks.

The plans were disclosed by Professor Pan Jianwei, a quantum physicist with the University of Science and Technology of China and a lead scientist behind the project.

“China’s quantum information science and technology is developing very fast and China leads in some areas in this field. Any city in China, as long they want to, can start to build the quantum communication network now,” he said, Xinhua reported.

Chen Yuxiang, chief engineer for the construction of the Beijing-Shanghai network, indicated that the infrastructure would be ready between the end of the year and next summer. The network also needs to be built and activated.

The budget for the Beijing-Shanghai project is estimated at 100 million yuan ($16 million) for every 10,000 users.

Theoretically, the quantum network can’t be hacked: should anyone try to intercept the encryption key, the physical status of the quantum data, or qubits, would change, and alert those who sent the information.

Europe, Japan and Canada are also planning to start their own quantum networks. The US has also been looking for funds to sponsor a 10,000-kilometer network between major cities.

Experts are sure, though, that China is ahead of everyone in the quantum network project.

“The Chinese are really pushing the boundaries. They are moving at an incredible rate. No one else around the world has plans that are this ambitious,” Raymond Laflamme, the head of the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo in Canada, told The Telegraph.

“China is putting itself in the position of having secure private information that other countries will not be able to tap,” he added.

​Source.

Russia’s domestic Internet traffic mysteriously passes through Chinese routers

This isn’t a simple case of BRICS implementing their own Internet, to circumvent NSA spying… Russia’s Internet traffic has been passing through China, the purpose of which remains a mystery to the vast majority. -LW


Unexplained diversion underscores insecurity of Net’s global routing system.

by  – Nov 9 2014, 1:00pm


Domestic Internet traffic traveling inside the borders of Russia has repeatedly been rerouted outside of the country under an unexplained series of events that degrades performance and could compromise the security of Russian communications.

The hijacking of Russian traffic is linked to last year’s peering agreement between Russian mobile provider Vimpelcom and China Telecom. The pact allowed the firms to save money by having some of their traffic carried over the other’s network rather than through a more expensive transit operator. On multiple occasions since then, according to Dyn, communications destined for Russia has followed extremely round-about routes that take the traffic into China before sending it on to its final stop. Doug Madory, director of internet analysis at Dyn, wrote:

Even Internet paths from Moscow to other parts of Russia were forced through China Telecom’s routers. In the following example, a traceroute from Moscow is taken by Vimpelcom to Frankfurt, handed over to China Telecom’s routers in Frankfurt and, (mercifully) redirected back into Russia via Megafon without getting directed out to Shanghai. (This diversion of domestic Russian traffic is illustrated in the graphic at the beginning of this blog.)

trace from Moscow, Russia to Yaroslavl, Russia at 13:13 Aug 05, 2014
 1 *
 2 194.154.89.125 (Vimpelcom, Moscow, RU) 0.542ms
 3 79.104.235.74 mx01.Frankfurt.gldn.net 37.006ms
 4 118.85.204.57 beeline-gw4.china-telecom.net 39.505ms
 5 213.248.84.185 ffm-b10-link.telia.net 41.481ms
 6 62.115.137.180 ffm-bb2-link.telia.net 42.227ms
 7 80.91.251.159 s-bb4-link.telia.net 42.894ms
 8 213.155.133.105 s-b2-link.telia.net 41.528ms
 9 80.239.128.234 megafon-ic-151430-s-b2.c.telia.net 42.707ms
 10 *
 11 78.25.73.42 (MegaFon, Volga,RU) 49.992ms
 12 213.187.127.98 ysu1-ccr1036-1.yar.ru 50.301ms
 13 213.187.117.230 (NETIS Telecom, Yaroslavl’, RU) 54.769ms

BGP is such a complex framework that improper routing of this type can often be the result of human error by engineers acting in good faith. But the same complexity and lack of security can just as easily be abused by hackers, government snoops, or vandals. Madory recommends operators of large networks carefully monitor the routes their traffic traverses and to filter the routes they receive. “Without both measures, your traffic could be easily misdirected, potentially hurting both the performance and security of your Internet communications,” he warned.

Article updated to edit headline.

Source.

Ted Talk: Magna Carta for the Web

What kind of Internet do you want? -LW


 

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness. The question is, What kind of Internet do we want?

Obama urges FCC to reclassify internet amid net neutrality protests

This is encouraging–Obama is pushing for net neutrality. -LW


U.S. President Barack Obama (Reuters/Wang Zhao)

U.S. President Barack Obama (Reuters/Wang Zhao)

The president’s remarks, posted to the White House website early Monday by way of both a video message and a written statement are among the most straightforward yet spoken by Obama after long advocating for net neutrality but publicly doing little in the face of the FCC’s looming decision on the matter.?United States President Barack Obama said Monday that the Federal Communications Commission should heed calls from the public concerning the future of the internet and “implement the strongest possible rules to protect net neutrality.”

In the coming months, the FCC is expected to finally announce its determination on what rules will be put in place pertaining to how Internet Service Providers, or ISPs, deliver content to customers across the US. Following months of discussions, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is expected to back a “hybrid” proposal that would “separate broadband into two distinct services: a retail one, in which consumers would pay broadband providers for Internet access; and a back-end one, in which broadband providers serve as the conduit for websites to distribute content,” according to a Wall Street Journal exclusive published recently. Much to the chagrin of open internet advocates, however, such a purported plan would not outright eliminate the ability for ISPs to create a multi-tier system in which the speed of that distribution differs depending on price.

“Simply put: No service should be stuck in a ‘slow lane’ because it does not pay a fee. That kind of gatekeeping would undermine the level playing field essential to the Internet’s growth,” Obama said Monday.

The campaign to reclassify ISPs as common carriers, like utility companies, has intensified in recent weeks on the eve of Wheeler’s impending unveiling of the new proposal, evidenced on Friday by coordinated demonstrations at a dozen cities across the US waged by activists equipped with signs inscribed with slogans such as “Save the Internet.” Outside the White House last Friday, protesters gathered to ask the president to take action before the FCC, and two days earlier an international day of action dubbed the “Million Mask March” saw activists take to the streets in cities around the world to ask for, among other things, a free and open internet.

Save the Internet! Net neutrality protest happening now at the White House http://t.co/TVzzNE3rkh (pic via @apblake)pic.twitter.com/OG4MPwBQLi

— RT America (@RT_America) November 6, 2014

Obama has previously advocated for maintaining an open internet while on the campaign trail and in office, but the reality of achieving as much has waned in recent months following a landmark decision last January in which the US Court of Appeals in Washington, DC found the FCC had erred by insisting ISPs must give customers equal access to all lawful content on the web. Activists responded to the ruling at the time by petitioning the president to “direct the FCC to reclassify Internet service providers as ‘common carriers’ which, if upheld, would give the FCC a distinct set of regulatory tools to promote net neutrality.” After garnering more than 105,000 signatures, however, the White House said in a statement last February that the final decision on the fate of net neutrality lies in the hands of the FCC, a an independent agency albeit one with an Obama appointee, Wheeler, at its helm.

On Monday, the president again acknowledged “The FCC is an independent agency, and ultimately this decision is theirs alone.” Nevertheless, Obama said he wants Wheeler and company to adopt “simple, common-sense steps that reflect the Internet” as it exists already, and described last January’s appeals ruling as “Unfortunate.”

“I believe the FCC should create a new set of rules protecting net neutrality and ensuring that neither the cable company nor the phone company will be able to act as a gatekeeper, restricting what you can do or see online,” Obama said.

“So the time has come for the FCC to recognize that broadband service is of the same importance and must carry the same obligations as so many of the other vital services do. To do that, I believe the FCC should reclassify consumer broadband service under Title II of the Telecommunications Act — while at the same time forbearing from rate regulation and other provisions less relevant to broadband services. This is a basic acknowledgment of the services ISPs provide to American homes and businesses, and the straightforward obligations necessary to ensure the network works for everyone — not just one or two companies.”

Moments before the president’s statement was published to the White House early Monday, protests were still occurring, at least in Washington, DC. There outside of Wheeler’s house, a group of net neutrality activists showed up shortly before 7 a.m. and blockaded his driveway with a sit-in demonstration that at one point led to a five-minute long conversation with the chairman before he ultimately retired realizing he would be unable to leave in his car.

“We’re blockading Tom Wheeler’s driveway because he’s made it clear that when he goes to work, he’s not working for the public, he’s working for Comcast, Verizon and AT&T, the companies that used to pay his salary when he was a lobbyist for the cable industry,” Kevin Zeese, co-director of the group Popular Resistance, said outside the Georgetown resident early Monday. “The future of the internet is a life or death matter for marginalized people all over the world. We cannot in good conscience allow this corrupt official to carry on with business as usual.”

Yet as word circulated soon after concerning the president’s plea to the FCC, activists fell short of expressing outright optimism and asked Obama to see to it that Wheeler acts on the voice of not just the commander-in-chief, but the millions of Americans passionate about protecting net neutrality.

“At this point it should be unthinkable that Tom Wheeler would defy both the American public *and* the President, but we hope President Obama is prepared to demote him if he doesn’t move forward in good faith with Title II reclassification,” Fight for the Future co-director Holmes Wilson said early Monday.

 

Source.

Anonymous Now: Million Mask March descends on London

The million mask march in London, England, is tomorrow . . .  -LW


Published time: November 04, 2014 15:23

Reuters/Andrew Winning

Reuters/Andrew Winning

 Organized by the global hacktivist group Anonymous, the London protest will march from Trafalgar Square and finish at the Houses of Parliament.The Million Mask March will course through London on Wednesday November 5. The march, in which all demonstrators obscure their faces to protect their identity, is in protest against austerity, mass surveillance and attacks on human rights.

It is unknown how many demonstrators will join the march, as pleas from police for information have remained unanswered.

In 2013 the event gathered crowds of more than 2,500. The Facebook event suggests over 6,000 people may attend this year.

AFP Photo/Will Oliver

AFP Photo/Will Oliver

Speaking to RT, an Anonymous source said the Million Mask March, a tradition began in 2011, was originally called OpVendetta, and initially only gathered a crowd of 50.

Within a year, the following had grown to 2,000, and in 2013 the decision was made to rename the march the “Million Mask March,” the source said.

In 2013, there were over 400 Anonymous demonstrations worldwide, held to coincide with the annual British tradition of Bonfire Night of November 5, the date on which a group of dissident plotters tried to blow up parliament in 1605. Attendants often wear a Guy Fawkes mask, made famous by the 2005 film V for Vendetta, which has become the group’s trademark disguise.

The global protests took place last year in various world cities including Vancouver, Tel Aviv, Dublin, Paris, Chicago and Sydney.

RT’s Anonymous source said: “It’s a night of grievance on a night that’s historically about parliament and how it’s not always working in the people’s interests.”

“We burn an effigy of Guy Fawkes on a fire each year as a warning against standing against parliament so we just felt it would be symbolic,” they added.

In the lead up to the march, Anonymous sent a direct message to global bodies of power.

“To oppressive governments, we say this: we do not expect our campaign to be completed in a short time frame. However, you will not prevail against the angry masses of the body politic.”

The message further addresses the British government, saying they have “made an enemy of Anonymous,” and that they have “angered them considerably.”

This annual protest against austerity comes after a wave of protests and strikes swept through the UK during September and October.

On October 12, National Health Service (NHS) workers staged a strike over an ongoing pay dispute. The four hour strike marked the first time in history in which nurses have taken strike action.

Three days later, on October 15, the Public Commercial Services union (PCS) walked out over a 1 percent pay rise cap – a pay cut in real terms. Some 200,000 public sector workers walked out for 24 hours, causing nationwide disruption to job centers, museums and courts.

More recently, police are alleged to have employed excessive violence against Occupy Democracy protesters in Parliament Square, forcibly removing tarpaulins and belongings and making over 40 arrests.

The Metropolitan Police say they wish to engage with Anonymous so they can“work together to ensure they can protest safely.”

Chief Superintendent Pippa Mills said they are trying to contact Anonymous, but“no one has come forward.”

“We are keen to talk with them to ensure they are able to protest; it is important that they talk to us so that we can work together to achieve a safe and successful event.”

Source.

Fight for the Future and Namecheap have parked a truck with a giant video billboard directly across the street from the FCC!

Have you seen this? Yesterday was the deadline for comments to the FCC on ‘net neutrality. -LW


This just in! We’ve teamed up with our friends at domain registrar Namecheap to bring the overwhelming public outcry for real net neutrality protections directly to the agency’s doorstep.

As the hours count down to the FCC’s net neutrality comment deadline, we have obtained a permit to park a truck with a giant video billboard on top directly across the street from the FCC facing the agency’s headquarters! It’s amazing! We’re attracting tons of attention already.

Got something to say to the FCC? Send us a link to your video and we’ll play it on the billboard!

Are you in Washington, DC? Join us, Free Press, and Popular Resistance on Tuesday, September 16th as we gather near the billboard to call for the FCC to get out of DC and listen to the public! More info here.

We’ll be here until the end of the day Tuesday playing a steady stream of videos about net neutrality. The FCC needs to hear from everyone — but not everyone can make it to DC to speak out. The billboard gives us all a platform from which to speak, just like the free and open Internet!

Internet, send us your videos! Take a short 1-2 minute video of yourself explaining why net neutrality matters to you, and we’ll play it on the billboard for Tom Wheeler and everyone at the FCC. Use the form below to submit your video or email it directly to ted@namecheap.com with the subject line “Billboard submission.”

Need some inspiration for what your net neutrality video should be like? Check out this awesome video that Namecheap made! They’ll be playing it once an hour to make sure the FCC gets the message.

Namecheap gets that Internet Freedom isn’t just a good idea, it’s a critical fight for the future of the entire web. Not only are they making the billboard action possible, but they’re helping raise funds for Fight for the Future to support our ongoing work for net neutrality. Head over to NetNeutrality.com and share the video there and they’ll donate to us each time!

Need more encouragement to submit your own video? Get ready for Harry Potter to break it down for you. Thanks to the Harry Potter Alliance.

See below for some more great photos. More coming soon! Press inquiries contact press@fightforthefuture.org or call 978-852-6457.

Crowd gathering right now outside the FCC as the billboard attracts attention from press, FCC employees, and passersby.

Folks from Namecheap are there with flyers to talk to FCC employees and pedestrians about why the Internet cares so much about net neutrality.

The billboard directly faces the FCC’s headquarters, and FCC employees can be seen looking down from the windows. Impossible to ignore.

The billboard will play a steady stream of videos in support of Title II net neutrality. Internet users are encouraged to submit videos to play on the billboard through this form.

Photo credits: Namecheap team. These photos are available for use by press.

Source.

LibTech NYC: Robert David Steele – The Open Source Everything Manifesto

In a nutshell, Robert David Steele’s solution is to have all 7 billion of us with 24/7 access to all information in all languages via the Internet.

Robert David Steele – The Open Source Everything Manifesto – at LibTech NYC on May 21 2014.

tinyurl.com/ose-2014

Libtech NYC 2014 — a half-day conference to “envision, learn, share and build robust, decentralized networks through participatory systems”, presented by the Internet Society’s New York Chapter (ISOC-NY) and RECLAIM.CC, as part of Internet Week NY.

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