Operation Hollywood

This interview is from 2004. With everything we are witnessing in the news today, it seems truer than ever, doesn’t it? -LW


How the Pentagon bullies movie producers into showing the U.S. military in the best possible light

—By Jeff Fleischer

To keep the Pentagon happy, some Hollywood producers have been known to turn villains into heroes, remove central characters, change politically sensitive settings, or add military rescues to movies that require none. There are no bad guys in the military. No fraternization between officers and enlisted troops. No drinking or drugs. No struggles against bigotry. The military and the president can’t look bad (though the State Department and Canada can).

“The only thing Hollywood likes more than a good movie is a good deal,” David Robb explains, and that’s why the producers of films like “Top Gun,” “Stripes” and “The Great Santini” have altered their scripts to accommodate Pentagon requests. In exchange, they get inexpensive access to the military locations, vehicles, troops and gear they need to make their movies.

During his years as a journalist for Daily Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, Robb heard about a quid-pro-quo agreement between the Pentagon and Hollywood studios, and decided to investigate. He combed through thousands of Pentagon documents, and interviewed dozens of screenwriters, producers and military officials. The result is his new book, “Operation Hollywood.”

Robb talked with MotherJones.com about deal-making that defines the relationship between Hollywood and the Pentagon.

MotherJones.com: How far back does collaboration between the U.S. military and Hollywood go?

David Robb: The current approval process was established right after World War II. Before that, the Pentagon used to help producers, but it wasn’t very formalized, like it is now. They helped producers going back to at least 1927. The very first movie that won an Oscar, “Wings,” — even that got military assistance.

MJ.com: What steps does a producer take to get assistance from the military? How does the process work?

DR: The first thing you have to do is send in a request for assistance, telling them what you want pretty specifically — ships, tanks, planes, bases, forts, submarines, troops — and when you want this material available. Then you have to send five copies of the script to the Pentagon, and they give it to the affected service branches — Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard. Then you wait and see if they like your script or not. If they like it, they’ll help you; if they don’t, they won’t. Almost always, they’ll make you make changes to the military depictions. And you have to make the changes that they ask for, or negotiate some kind of compromise, or you don’t get the stuff.

So then you finally get the approval, after you change your script to mollify the military, put some stuff in about how great it is to be in the military. Then when you go to shoot the film, you have to have what I call a “military minder” — but what they call a “technical advisor” — someone from the military on the set to make sure you shoot the film the way you agreed to. Normally in the filmmaking process, script changes are made all the time; if something isn’t working, they look at the rushes, and say, “let’s change this.” Well, if you want to change something that has to do with the military depictions, you’ve got to negotiate with them again. And they can say, “No, you can’t change it, this is the deal you agreed to.” As one of the technical advisors, Maj. David Georgi of the Army, said to me, “If they don’t do what I say, I take my toys and go away.”

After the film is completed, you have to prescreen the film for the Pentagon brass. So before it’s shown to the public, you have to show your movie to the generals and admirals, which I think any American should find objectionable — that their movies are being prescreened by the military.

MJ.com: At that stage, with the film finished, what can the military do if they have a problem?

DR: This happened on the Clint Eastwood movie “Heartbreak Ridge.” He finished the film, showed it to them, and they went through the roof. There was a scene in the script where he shoots an injured and defenseless Cuban soldier. They said, “You have to take that out. It’s a war crime. We don’t want that.” They hate having war crimes in movies. So with “Heartbreak Ridge,” Eastwood shot the film, and the scene ended up in the movie anyway. They said, “We told you to take that out.” He said he thought it was only a suggestion, that he didn’t know he had to. So they withdrew their approval. The film was still released, of course. But at the end of a movie that gets military assistance, there’s always a little tagline that says “thanks to the cooperation of the U.S. Army” or whatever branch. They said, “We’re not going to let you put that on there. We’re withdrawing cooperation.” And they can stop it from being shown in military theaters overseas or on bases in the U.S., which can really hurt the box office of a film. They’ve done this to numerous films. Also, at that time, Clint Eastwood was the chairman of Toys for Tots, the Marine Corps Christmas gift program for poor children. He wanted to screen the movie at a premiere to benefit Toys for Tots, and they said, “We’re not going to let you do that.” They can be very spiteful, they can hurt the box office of a film, and they don’t forget, either. So you do this at your peril. They can’t arrest you, they can’t stop the film. But if you want cooperation again, and you’ve screwed them like that before, you’re not going to get it. People almost never screw the Army on these deals.

MJ.com: What criteria does the Pentagon use in deciding whether to help a film?

DR: The most important one is that the film has to “aid in the retention and recruitment of personnel.” I don’t want to say that’s the whole thing, but it’s the main thing. They also say it has to reasonably depict military operations. And if it’s based on history, they say it has to be historically accurate, which is really a code. They’re much less interested in reality and accuracy than they are in positive images. They often try to change historical facts that are negative. Like with the movie “Thirteen Days,” which was very accurate but very negative toward the military during the Cuban missile crisis, showing that they would have taken us down the path toward World War III. During the negotiations with the producers, Peter Almond and Kevin Costner, the military tried to get them to tone down the bellicose nature of Gen. Maxwell Taylor and Gen. Curtis LeMay — who the record is very clear on, because before Nixon was taping in the White House, Kennedy was taping in the White House, and all the conversations from October 1962 are on tape. When Kennedy rejected LeMay’s insistence that we attack Cuba — when Kennedy said let’s put up a naval blockade, we don’t want to get into war — you can hear Curtis LeMay say, “This is the worst sellout since Munich.” He actually said that, when he didn’t think anybody was listening. Well, the military wanted to change it anyway, saying he was too bellicose and they had to tone it down. To their credit, Kevin Costner and Peter Almond stood up to the military, refused to buckle under, and made their film without military assistance.

MJ.com: Why don’t more producers take that approach?

DR: A lot of the studio heads tell their producers, “We’re not going to make this film unless we get military assistance, because it would be too expensive. So you’d better make sure the script conforms to what they want.” Also, what you don’t see in these documents is the self-censorship that goes with knowing you need their assistance and that they’re going to be your first audience. Writers write stuff to get that military assistance. So there’s no documents saying, “In “Black Hawk Down,” let’s leave out the whole part about the soldiers being dragged through the streets of Mogadishu.” Jerry Bruckheimer knows that if they have that in there, the military’s just going to tell them to take it out or they won’t help them. I asked Ridley Scott, the director, if “Black Hawk Down” could have been made without military assistance. He said, “Yeah. We just would have had to call it ‘Huey Down’.” So there’s this self-censorship. When you know the government is looking over your shoulder while you’re typing, that’s a very bad situation.

MJ.com: Aside from showing war crimes, what are some of the other things the military balks at?

DR: They never — at least that I’ve seen — help movies with aliens. Usually in those movies, the military is shown to be ineffective in combating the aliens, and it’s always some tricky, enterprising person who figures out how to defeat them. Like in “Mars Attacks!,” a grandma playing Slim Whitman over her radio blows the aliens’ heads up. Well, the military didn’t want to help them. They don’t want to help any movie that shows them being ineffective, even in combating aliens. They have no sense of humor! They wouldn’t help “Independence Day.” The military could not get over the fact that one of the key plot points was that the U.S. was secretly working on a spaceship captured at Area 51, so the film ended up not getting assistance.

Another thing, they don’t like drinking or drugs in the military. They’ll make you change that. Like in “Stripes,” they made them take out all drug references, and the original script had lots of drug references. They don’t want to see any pot smoking, even in Vietnam. The former Navy Secretary James Webb, after he left that post, he became a book writer. He’d been a Marine in Vietnam, and one of his books was semi-autobiographical, with many of the things he saw and knew for a fact happened in Vietnam: fragging of officers, smoking pot, burning Vietnamese villages. He had a screenplay and wanted to turn it into a movie. They said, “No, you have to change all this stuff,” and he wouldn’t do it. So that’s a film that never got made. Many films have never been made because they couldn’t get assistance.

MJ.com: In the book, you give examples of how the Pentagon won’t allow military characters to be depicted as bad guys.

DR: Right. For example, there was an HBO movie “The Tuskegee Airmen,” where the military made them replace the villain. This was a movie about the first black airmen during World War II, where the bad guy was a general at the base where these guys were training, and the good guy was a white congressman. Well, the army said they didn’t like that, so they ended up changing it. I have a letter where the producers wrote to the military, to Phil Strub, who’s the head of the Pentagon’s film office. The producers wrote, “The following changes are in the works and will soon be fully executed by the writer. It is our intention to reverse the characterization of General Stevenson and Senator Powell, making the senator the source of bigotry. General Stevenson will be revealed as someone who is loyal to the efforts of the Tuskegee Airmen.” Now when people saw that film, they had no idea that the good guy and the bad guy had been reversed, just so the military could meet its recruiting goals.

MJ.com: You also talk about the military targeting children by encouraging pro-military storylines in shows like “The Mickey Mouse Club” and “Lassie.”

DR: In those cases, they recognized that children are the future recruits. With the “Mickey Mouse Club,” it’s kind of a long story, but they used to show these little documentary films called “Mouse Reels.” For example, they took these kids out on the U.S.S. Nautilus, which was the first nuclear submarine. And there’s a Pentagon document that says, “This is an excellent opportunity to introduce a whole new generation to the nuclear Navy.” It was all military propaganda to show how “child-friendly” nuclear submarines are – there’s hardly any radiation, the food is great, they even have a jukebox that plays the “Mickey Mouse Club March” in the cafeteria.

As far as reaching children, I think one of the best examples — and they’re very candid in these documents, because I don’t think they ever expected anybody to be looking at this stuff — there was this movie “The Right Stuff” about the early days of the space program. The original script was filled with vulgarity and cussing, and the military sent the producers a letter. It reads, “The obscene language used seems to guarantee an ‘R’ rating. If distributed as an ‘R’, it cuts down on the teenage audience, which is a prime one to the military services when our recruiting bills are considered.” Of course, an ‘R’ rating means children under 17 have to be accompanied by a parent, so a lot of 16- and 17-year-olds couldn’t see this picture. And the Air Force wanted young people to see this so they’d get a good, positive image of the military and join up. So they changed it.

MJ.com: Among the films you looked at, which went through the most radical change from the script to the final, military-assisted movie?

DR: There was a movie called “Air Strike” by a guy named Cy Roth. Now, Ed Wood is often credited as being the worst director in Hollywood history, but Cy Roth would really give him a run for his money. Roth decided around 1953 that he’d made a Western, he’d made a space movie, now he wanted to make a war movie. This movie was set on a World War II aircraft carrier, and the lead characters were a young Jewish flyer and a young black flyer who are constantly being subjected to anti-Semitism and racism on the ship. The military said, “No, we don’t want to show any kind of racism or anti-Semitism in this picture, you’ve got to change that.” They also said, “We don’t want a World War II-era picture, we want a movie set in the modern jet age.” And Roth went nuts. He called his congressman, he wrote a letter to President Eisenhower — and the day after the White House got his letter of complaint, they sicced the FBI on him to see whether he was a Communist or not. Well, he finally caved in; he made the picture the way they wanted. So it was no blacks, no Jews, no propellers. If you look at this film, it’s so bad, it looks like a home movie shot on an aircraft carrier. So this film was completely changed.

MJ.com: You argue that this military screening process violates the First Amendment.

DR: The First Amendment doesn’t just give people the right to free speech; fundamentally, it prevents the government from favoring one form of speech over another. There’s a great 1995 Supreme Court case called Rosenberger v. University of Virginia that says, “Discrimination against speech because of its message is presumed to be unconstitutional. It is axiomatic that the government may not regulate speech based on the substantive content of the message it conveys. In the realm of private speech or expression, government regulation may not favor one speaker over another.” And yet that’s what they’re doing every day. Not just 50 years ago on “Air Strike,” but right now. This is a holdover from the Cold War, and it should be abolished. Or at least Congress, which has oversight over the Pentagon, should really look into what’s going on.

Congress has only looked into it twice, when Robert Aldrich made a stink about not getting assistance for the movie “Attack,” and then again in the 1960s when it turned out the government had footed the entire bill for all the military stuff on John Wayne’s “The Green Berets.” In these two investigations, the Pentagon basically said it’s not their intention to influence the content of movies. And Congress just accepted that. If they looked at these documents, they would see that clearly the intent is to influence the movies.

Major Georgi, who had been the military minder on many movies, said that one of the targets of this program is Congress; that Congress goes to movies, and that when they see positive images of the military, that makes it easier for them to vote for that $500 billion military appropriation. They also target voters, the people who are really footing the bill. Really, if you talk to soldiers and sailors and Marines, many of them will tell you they joined the military because of some movie that they saw. The former head of the Marine Corps film office, Matt Morgan, he told me he joined the military after seeing “Top Gun.” After “Top Gun” came out, there was a huge spike in recruitment for the Navy flying program. They know that it works. People are going off to war and getting killed, in part because of some movie that they saw that was adjusted by the military.

MJ.com: What would it realistically take to change this system?

DR: I think that if just 50 people wrote their congressman and asked, “what’s going on here?,” I think it wouldn’t take much. It’s not going to happen otherwise. The Writer’s Guild, whose stated mission is to protect the creative and economic rights of its members, has never made a single protest that its members’ scripts are being manipulated and changed by the military. Congress has done nothing. Hollywood likes the way it is, and the military likes the way it is; they don’t want to change it. The only people who have a real interest in this are the American people. They’re being saturated with military propaganda in their mainstream movies and TV shows, and they don’t even know. But I think there’s a very good argument that can be made that over the past 50 years, this chronic sanitization of the military and what war is has affected the American character; that we’re now a more warlike people than we were 50 years ago. Clearly, there are also other reasons, but I think when the world’s most powerful medium colludes with the world’s most powerful military to put propaganda in mainstream films and television shows, that has to have an effect on the American psyche.

Source.

Hupacasath First Nation Puts China on Notice Over Canada-China Trade Agreement (FIPA)

This is the latest development in a string of situations where First Nations people are refusing to acknowledge the authority of the corporate government(s). In this case, they are refusing to acknowledge the Canadian government’s authority to include their land and resources in a back room deal between Canada’s PM Harper and the Premier of China. The agreement was signed and ratified, even though it was in the process of being challenged in Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal. -LW


The Hupcasasath First Nation, the small nation on Vancouver Island which fought a two-year court battle over the constitutionality of the controversial Canada-China FIPA (Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement) today sent a letter to the Premier of China giving notice that the Hupacasath does not consider itself bound by the terms of the agreement.

The Canada-China FIPA (or FIPPA) was quietly ratified by Canada on September 12 and entered into force on October 1. Under the terms of the agreement, the FIPA and the investor rights it grants will be in force for a minimum of 31 years. The Canadian ratification came two years after the agreement was signed, and was ratified despite the fact that the Hupacasath’s legal challenge was still being considered by the Federal Court of Appeal.

“We want to make it clear to the People’s Republic of China that Hupacasath territory is not open to business under FIPPA and that our consent is needed before there is any development of our lands and resources,” explained Hupacasath Chief Steven Tatoosh. “This step must be taken to protect our rights and title as the government of Canada is not doing so. Canada has the duty to consult with First Nations and obtain our consent and without this and a decision from the Court, it is impossible for Hupacasath First Nation to accept the ratification of FIPPA.”

“Hupacasath First Nation will not consent to any development in our territory that negatively impacts or abrogates our title and rights. We launched our court action on FIPPA in order to protect our rights and title and our way of life which is dependent on the existence of certain ecosystems and the maintenance of high environmental standards,” the letter states.

“The manner in which FIPPA was ratified has engendered increasingly strong opposition from First Nations and Canadians across the country, and has served to embroil the People’s Republic of China in a domestic dispute. This dispute will take the form of resistance from Hupacasath First Nation and many other First Nations to any resource development on our title lands. Opposition will manifest itself in regulatory processes, court cases, and the defense of our lands on the ground.

“We feel it important to inform you of Hupacasath First Nation’s views and positions before you decide to do any development within our territory. To be clear, our dispute is with Canada and because of the FIPPA the People’s Republic of China has become involved with Canada’s internal matters. The People’s Republic of China is now on notice that any investment or development proposed by China state-owned corporations is not welcome within Hupacasath First Nation territory.”

The Hupacasath letter comes a day after a similar notice was sent by the Onihcikiskwapowin (Saddle Lake Cree Nation) of Treaty 6 Territory in Alberta.

The Hupacasath is also encouraging other First Nations and concerned municipalities to do the same, stating on its website, “Together we must make it clear to the People’s Republic of China that the Government of Canada did not follow due process by consulting First Nations, municipalities, parliament, and the citizens of Canada.”

 

 

Source.

Canadian-made Ebola vaccine to start clinical trials in healthy humans

This is unbelievable… Canada is going to start testing an Ebola vaccine on healthy humans. This should be a RED FLAG all by itself. Since when do they test cancer treatments healthy humans. This, and this alone, should convince you that all of what they are telling you is a bold-faced lie. If you watch the video, you’ll see they’ve even got someone on camera saying, “Gee, the government is doing this in our best interests.” Do you think he was paid, or does he really believe what he is saying? Why is there no mention of vitamin C, silver, or UV lights as possible treatments? -LW


Human testing of an experimental Canadian-made Ebola vaccine began Monday, with federal officials saying the drug could be shipped to West Africa within months if it proves successful.

Health Minister Rona Ambrose said the launch of the vaccine’s first clinical trial marks a promising step in the global campaign to contain the virus, which the World Health Organization says has killed more than 4,000 people.

“This provides hope because if the Canadian vaccine is shown to be safe and effective, it will stop this devastating outbreak,” Ambrose said in a conference call from Calgary.

Twenty vials of the vaccine have been sent to the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Maryland for testing on about 40 healthy volunteers, she said.

The Phase 1 trial will determine if the vaccine created by Public Health Agency of Canada and known as VSV-EBOV is safe for human use. It will also determine the proper dosage level and test for possible side effects, Ambrose said.

Studies have shown the vaccine works in primates both to prevent infection when given before exposure and to increase survival chances when given quickly after exposure.

Canada’s chief public health officer said results from the human trial are expected by December, and if successful, the next stage would be to test it in a larger human sample, including those directly handling Ebola cases in West Africa.

“The health-care workers on the ground are the most likely target to do the next step,” which could begin by the end of the year or early 2015, Dr. Gregory Taylor said in a news conference in Toronto.

“Clearly if those studies show that it’s effective in health-care workers, the world would go into mass production.”

A small U.S. company called NewLink Genetics holds the licence for the vaccine and will be arranging the trials at the U.S. military lab.

NewLink said earlier this month that at least five clinical trials involving the vaccine would soon be underway in the United States, Germany, Switzerland and in an unnamed African country which is not battling Ebola. The Canadian government has also said it wants to conduct a trial in this country.

The aim of these early trials is to see if the vaccine is safe for human use and how much vaccine is needed to generate what is hoped to be a protective response in people.

Another leading Ebola vaccine candidate, created in the laboratories of the U.S. National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been licensed to pharma giant GlaxoSmithKline (now known as GSK). The first clinical trial with that vaccine, called cAd3, began in early September.

There have been no reported Canadian cases and health officials maintain the risk of Ebola emerging remains very low.

It was a message that officials in two Ontario cities stressed again on Monday as they announced that two patients — one in Ottawa, the other in Belleville — were placed in isolation as a precaution because they showed Ebola like symptoms.

Later Monday, Ottawa public health tweeted that Ebola had been ruled out in the case it was watching.

The patient in Belleville was in Sierra Leone recently but doctors considered it unlikely the symptoms would turn out to be Ebola, said Dr. Richard Schabas, the medical health officer responsible for Belleville.

”You’re going to see many instances like this over the next few weeks as health care workers and others return from the area (West Africa),” Schabas told a news conference in the eastern Ontario city.

”We’re going to become very used to it.”

Preliminary test results in both cases were expected later Monday or Tuesday.

Stricter screening measures, including the posting of quarantine officers at airports in Toronto and Montreal, are nonetheless being implemented after the first case of human-to-human transmission in the United States, Ambrose said.

One man died from Ebola in Texas after contracting it in Liberia, and it was announced Sunday that a nurse at the man’s hospital has also become infected with the virus despite wearing protective equipment.

While there are no direct flights to Canada from West Africa, about 30 people a week arrive on connecting flights from Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia — the three African countries devastated by Ebola, Ambrose said.

“We’re not talking about a great deal of people. We’re also talking about a situation where Canadian border service agents are alerted, or should be alerted, about whether travellers are originating in any of the affected countries.”

Ottawa is urging the 216 Canadians known to be living in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia to come home immediately, but Ambrose said a travel ban is not currently being considered.

Taylor said he would be meeting with provincial and territorial public health officials on Tuesday to review existing guidelines on how frontline health workers would handle an Ebola patient.

Source.


Related

Have you seen this? A collection of WANTED posters for 741 globalists

I’m still investigating this “Round-op Alpha”. This list was posted back in April. Somebody has gone to a lot of work to create all of these WANTED posters. As I often counsel others, “Assume the feeling of the wish fulfilled.” Consider these WANTED posters to be visual aids, if nothing else. For the adventurous, do you think these could get some attention if distributed as flyers or mailings? Flash mobs? I wonder… -LW


List R-oA2014

GLOBAL OPERATION FOR THE ARREST OF THE WORLD GOVERNMENT

The following 741 individuals all actively and knowingly conspire in well-planned efforts and constructions to consolidate power and resources – with the intention to establish a world government which would provide them with full immunity from any form of prosecution regarding their past and future crimes – and are therefore, according to Round-op Alpha, collectively guilty of crimes against the sovereignty of their respective nations and against humanity as a whole, i.e.:

  • High-level brigandage: Looting of public wealth; oppressing of populations; attacking the rights to good health, education, personal/national sovereignty and real security; the murdering in name of corporate profits; democide; psychological warfare; (eco-) terrorism – which deliberately jeopardizes any attempts for world peace and causes regional, cultural tensions, armed conflicts, forced poverty and the decay of the public’s health, the public order and society as a whole.

PDF files not displaying properly online? Right-click and “save link as…”

UNITED NATIONS

  1. Ki-moon, Ban /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  2. Eliasson, Jan /SWEDEN/ PDF
  3. Malcorra, Susana /ARGENTINA/ PDF
  4. Ashe, John W. /ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA/ PDF
  5. Sajdik, Martin /AUSTRIA – USA/ PDF
  6. Tomka, Peter /SLOVAKIA/ PDF
  7. Sepúlveda-Amor, Bernardo /MEXICO/ PDF
  8. Pachauri, Rajendra K. /INDIA/ PDF
  9. Lee, Hoesung /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  10. van Ypersele, Jean-Pascal /BELGIUM/ PDF
  11. El Gizouli, Ismail A.R. /SUDAN/ PDF
  12. Bokova, Irina /BULGARIA/ PDF
  13. da Silva, José Graziano /BRAZIL/ PDF
  14. Aliu, Olumuyiwa Benard /NIGERIA/ PDF
  15. Nwanze, Kanayo F. /NIGERIA/ PDF
  16. Sekimizu, Koji /JAPAN/ PDF
  17. Lagarde, Christine /FRANCE/ PDF
  18. Lipton, David /USA/ PDF
  19. Viñals, José /SPAIN/ PDF
  20. Blanchard, Olivier /FRANCE/ PDF
  21. Touré, Hamadoun /MALI/ PDF
  22. Zhao, Houlin /CHINA/ PDF
  23. Yong, Li /CHINA/ PDF
  24. Chan, Margaret /CHINA/ PDF
  25. Halton, Jane /AUSTRALIA/PDF
  26. Grimes, David /CANADA/ PDF
  27. Moura, Antonio Divino /BRAZIL/ PDF
  28. Ostojski, Mieczyslaw S. /POLAND/ PDF
  29. Mokssit, Abdalah /MOROCCO/ PDF
  30. Zerbo, Lassina /BURKINA FASO/ PDF
  31. Dubourg, Thierry /FRANCE/ PDF
  32. Li, Genxin /CHINA/ PDF
  33. Bell, W. Randy /USA/ PDF
  34. Maryssael, Vorian /MEXICO/ PDF
  35. Rozhkov, Oleg /RUSSIA/ PDF
  36. Ozawa, Toshiro /JAPAN/ PDF
  37. Azeez, Aliyar Lebbe Abdul /SRI LANKA/ PDF
  38. Haak, Hein [12] /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  39. Weston, Michael [12] /UK/ PDF
  40. Amano, Yukiya /JAPAN/ PDF
  41. Dunn Lee, Janice /USA/ PDF
  42. Mohamad, Daud /MALAYSIA/ PDF
  43. Aning, Kwaku /GHANA – USA/ PDF
  44. Varjoranta, Tero /FINLAND/ PDF
  45. Bychkov, Alexander /RUSSIA/ PDF
  46. Flory, Denis /FRANCE/ PDF
  47. Horin, Olexandr [12] /UKRAINE/ PDF
  48. Azevêdo, Roberto /BRAZIL/ PDF
  49. Agah, Yonov Frederick [12] /NIGERIA/ PDF
  50. Brauner, Karl [12] /GERMANY/ PDF
  51. Shark, David [12] /USA/ PDF
  52. Xiaozhun, Yi [12] /CHINA/ PDF
  53. Gore, Al /USA/ PDF
  54. Buffett, Warren [2] /USA/ PDF

WORLD BANK GROUP

  1. Kim, Jim Yong [12] /USA – SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  2. Indrawati, Sri Mulyani /INDONESIA – USA/ PDF
  3. Badré, Bertrand /FRANCE/ PDF
  4. Mohieldin, Mahmoud /EGYPT/ PDF
  5. Basu, Kaushik [12] /INDIA/ PDF
  6. Leroy, Anne-Marie /FRANCE/ PDF
  7. Kyte, Rachel /USA/ PDF
  8. De Villeroche, Hervé /FRANCE/ PDF
  9. Hines, Gwen /UK/ PDF
  10. Hoven, Ingrid G. /GERMANY/ PDF
  11. Aviel, Sara Margalit [12] /USA/ PDF
  12. Suzuki, Hideaki /JAPAN/ PDF
  13. Chen, Shixin /CHINA/ PDF

BILDERBERG

  1. Rothensteiner, Walter /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  2. Treichl, Andreas /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  3. Sigurgestsson, Hörður /ICELAND/ PDF
  4. Lundestad, Geir /NORWAY/ PDF
  5. de Oliveira, Manuel Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  6. Salgado, Ricardo /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  7. Silva, Artur Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  8. Mazzie, Mark G. /USA/ PDF
  9. McKinnon, Neil /CANADA/ (status unknown) PDF
  10. Sikora, Sławomir /POLAND/ PDF
  11. Bon, Michel /FRANCE/ PDF
  12. Lévy-Lang, André /FRANCE/ PDF
  13. Schrempp, Jürgen Erich /GERMANY/ PDF
  14. Szwajcowski, Jacek /POLAND/ PDF
  15. Barnevik, Percy Nils /SWEDEN/ PDF
  16. Stråberg, Hans /SWEDEN/ PDF
  17. Uǧur, Agah [2] /TURKEY/ PDF
  18. Browne, Edmund John Philip /UK/ PDF
  19. Gerstner, Louis Vincent /USA/ PDF
  20. Bergsten, C. Fred /FRANCE/ PDF
  21. Pipes, Richard Edgar [2] /USA/ PDF
  22. Black, Conrad Moffat /CANADA/ PDF
  23. Frum, David J. /CANADA/ PDF
  24. Beytout, Nicolas /FRANCE/ PDF
  25. Rossella, Carlo /ITALY/ PDF
  26. Ringier, Michael /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  27. Kohen, Sami [2] /TURKEY/ PDF
  28. Hutton, William Nicolas /UK/ PDF
  29. Knight, Andrew Stephen Bower /UK/ PDF
  30. Stephanopoulos, George Robert /USA/ PDF
  31. Scheel, Walter /GERMANY/ PDF
  32. Eliot, Theodore L. /USA/ PDF
  33. Yost, Casimir A. /USA/ PDF
  34. Allaire, Paul Arthur /USA/ PDF
  35. Rockefeller, Sharon Percy /USA/ PDF

BILDERBERG [2010201120122013]

  1. Davignon, Etienne /BELGIUM/ Vice Chairman, Suez-Tractebel PDF
  2. Achleitner, Paul M. /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Deutsche Bank AG PDF
  3. Ackermann, Josef /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Management Board and the Group Executive Committee, Deutsche Bank AG PDF
  4. Agius, Marcus /UK/ Former Chairman, Barclays Bank PLC PDF
  5. Ajami, Fouad /USA/ Senior Fellow, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University PDF
  6. Alexander, Helen /UK/ Chairman, UBM plc PDF
  7. Alexander, Keith B. /USA/ Commander, USCYBERCOM; Director, National Security AgencyPDF
  8. Alierta, César /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, TelefónicaPDF
  9. Almunia, Joaquín /SPAIN/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  10. Altman, Roger C. /USA/ Chairman, Evercore Partners Inc. PDF
  11. Amado, Luís /PORTUGAL/ Chairman, Banco Internacional do Funchal (BANIF) PDF
  12. Andresen, Johan H. /NORWAY/ Owner and CEO, FERDPDF
  13. Apunen, Matti /FINLAND/ Director, Finnish Business and Policy Forum EVA PDF
  14. Arrison, Sonia /USA/ Author and policy analyst PDF
  15. Athey, Susan /USA/ Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business PDF
  16. Aydıntaşbaş, Aslı /TURKEY/ Columnist, Milliyet Newspaper PDF
  17. Babacan, Ali /TURKEY/ Deputy Prime Minister for Economic and Financial Affairs PDF
  18. Bäckström, Urban /SWEDEN/ Director General, Confederation of Swedish Enterprise PDF
  19. Balls, Edward M. /UK/ Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer PDF
  20. Balsemão, Francisco Pinto /PORTUGAL/ Chairman and CEO, IMPRESA, S.G.P.S.; Former Prime MinisterPDF
  21. Barré, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Managing Editor, Les EchosPDF
  22. Barroso, José M. Durão /PORTUGAL/ President, European Commission PDF
  23. Baverez, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP PDF
  24. Bavinchove, Olivier de /FRANCE/ Commander, Eurocorps PDF
  25. Bazire, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Managing Director, Groupe Arnault /LVMH PDF
  26. Béchu, Christophe /FRANCE/ Senator, and Chairman, General Council of Maine-et-Loire PDF
  27. Bell, John /UK/ Regius Professor of Medicine, University of Oxford PDF
  28. Berberoğlu, Enis /TURKEY/ Editor-in-Chief, Hürriyet Newspaper PDF
  29. Bernabè, Franco /ITALY/ CEO, Telecom Italia S.p.A.PDF
  30. Bezos, Jeff /USA/ Founder and CEO, Amazon.com PDF
  31. Bildt, Carl /SWEDEN/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  32. Björling, Ewa /SWEDEN/ Minister for Trade PDF
  33. Blåfield, Antti /FINLAND/ Senior Editorial Writer, Helsingin Sanomat PDF
  34. Boles, Nick /UK/ Member of Parliament PDF
  35. Bolland, Marc J. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chief Executive, Marks and Spencer Group plc PDF
  36. Bonnier, Jonas /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Bonnier AB PDF
  37. Borg, Anders /SWEDEN/ Minister for Finance PDF
  38. Botín, Ana P. /SPAIN/ Executive Chairman, BanestoPDF
  39. Boxmeer, Jean François van /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman of the Executive Board and CEO, Heineken N.V. PDF
  40. Brabeck-Letmathe, Peter /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Nestlé S.A. PDF
  41. Brandtzæg, Svein Richard /NORWAY/ CEO, Norsk Hydro ASA PDF
  42. Bredow, Vendeline von /UK/ Business Correspondent, The Economist PDF
  43. Bronner, Oscar /AUSTRIA/ Publisher and Editor, Der Standard PDF
  44. Çakir, Ruşen /TURKEY/ Journalist PDF
  45. Cameron, David /UK/ Prime Minister PDF
  46. Campbell, Gordon /CANADA/ Premier of British Columbia PDF
  47. Carlsson, Gunilla /SWEDEN/ Minister for International Development Cooperation PDF
  48. Carney, Mark J. /CANADA/ Governor, Bank of CanadaPDF
  49. Carvajal Urquijo, Jaime /SPAIN/ Managing Director, Advent International PDF
  50. Castries, Henri de /FRANCE/ Chairman of the Management Board and CEO, AXA PDF
  51. Cebrián, Juan Luis /SPAIN/ CEO, PRISA PDF
  52. Cernko, Willibald /AUSTRIA/ CEO, UniCredit Bank Austria AG PDF
  53. Chalendar, Pierre André de /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Saint-Gobain PDF
  54. Chavannes, Marc E. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Political Columnist, NRC Handelsblad; Professor of Journalism, University of Groningen PDF
  55. Christiansen, Jeppe /DENMARK/ CEO, Maj Invest PDF
  56. Chubais, Anatoly B. /RUSSIA/ CEO, OJSC RUSNANOPDF
  57. Ciliv, Süreyya /TURKEY/ CEO, Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri A.S. PDF
  58. Cisneros, Gustavo A. /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, Cisneros Group of Companies PDF
  59. Clark, W. Edmund /CANADA/ President and CEO, TD Bank Financial Group PDF
  60. Clarke, Kenneth /UK/ Member of Parliament, Lord Chancellor and Secretary of Justice PDF
  61. Coene, Luc /BELGIUM/ Governor, National Bank of Belgium PDF
  62. Collins, Timothy C. /USA/ Senior Managing Director and CEO, Ripplewood Holdings, LLC PDF
  63. Conti, Fulvio /ITALY/ CEO and General Manager, Enel SpA PDF
  64. Corydon, Bjarne /DENMARK/ Minister of Finance PDF
  65. Cospedal, María Dolores de /SPAIN/Secretary General, Partido Popular PDF
  66. Cowper-Coles, Sherard /UK/ Business Development Director, International, BAE Systems plc PDF
  67. Cucchiani, Enrico Tommaso /ITALY/ CEO, Intesa Sanpaolo SpA PDF
  68. Daele, Frans van /BELGIUM/ Chief of Staff to the President of the European Council PDF
  69. Daniels, Jr., Mitchell E. /USA/ Governor of IndianaPDF
  70. David, George A. /GREECE/ Chairman, Coca-Cola H.B.C. S.A. PDF
  71. Davis, Ian /UK/ Chairman, Rolls-Royce plc PDF
  72. DeMuth, Christopher /USA/ Distinguished Fellow, Hudson Institute PDF
  73. Dijkgraaf, Robbert H. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Director and Leon Levy Professor, Institute for Advanced Study PDF
  74. Dinçer, Haluk /TURKEY/ President, Retail and Insurance Group, Sabancı Holding A.S. PDF
  75. Donilon, Thomas E. /USA/ National Security Advisor, The White House PDF
  76. Dudley, Robert /UK/ Group Chief Executive, BP plcPDF
  77. Eberstadt, Nicholas N. /USA/ Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy, American Enterprise Institute PDF
  78. Eide, Espen Barth /NORWAY/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  79. Ekholm, Börje /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Investor AB PDF
  80. Eldrup, Anders /DENMARK/ CEO, DONG Energy PDF
  81. Elkann, John /ITALY/ Chairman, Fiat S.p.A. PDF
  82. Enders, Thomas /GERMANY/ CEO, Airbus SAS PDF
  83. Entrecanales, José Manuel /SPAIN/ Chairman, Acciona PDF
  84. Evans, J. Michael /USA/ Vice Chairman, Global Head of Growth Markets, Goldman Sachs & Co. PDF
  85. Faymann, Werner /AUSTRIA/ Federal Chancellor PDF
  86. Federspiel, Ulrik /DENMARK/ Vice President Global Affairs, Haldor Topsøe A/S PDF
  87. Feldstein, Martin S. /USA/ George F. Baker Professor of Economics, Harvard University PDF
  88. Ferguson, Niall /USA/ Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University PDF
  89. Ferreira Alves, Clara /PORTUGAL/ CEO, Claref LDA; writer [123PDF
  90. Fillon, François /FRANCE/ Former Prime Minister PDF
  91. Fischer, Heinz /AUSTRIA/ Federal President PDF
  92. Fishman, Mark C. /USA/ President, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research PDF
  93. Flint, Douglas J. /UK/ Group Chairman, HSBC Holdings plc PDF
  94. Fu, Ying /CHINA/ Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  95. Gallagher, Paul /IRELAND/ Attorney General PDF
  96. Gates, William H. /USA/ Co-chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Chairman, Microsoft Corporation PDF
  97. Gephardt, Richard A. /USA/ President and CEO, Gephardt Group PDF
  98. Gfoeller, Michael /USA/ Political Consultant PDF
  99. Giannitsis, Anastasios /GREECE/ Former Minister of Interior; Professor of Development and International Economics, University of Athens PDF
  100. Goolsbee, Austan D. /USA/ Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business PDF
  101. Gordon, Philip H. /USA/ Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs PDF
  102. Graham, Donald E. /USA/ Chairman and CEO, The Washington Post Company PDF
  103. Groth, Hans /SWITZERLAND/ Senior Director, Healthcare Policy & Market Access, Oncology Business Unit, Pfizer Europe PDF
  104. Gruber, Lilli /ITALY/ Journalist – Anchorwoman, La 7 TV PDF
  105. Gucht, Karel de /BELGIUM/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  106. Guindos, Luis de /SPAIN/ Minister of Economy and Competitiveness PDF
  107. Gülek Domac, Tayyibe /TURKEY/ Former Minister of State [12PDF
  108. Gürel, Z. Damla /TURKEY/ Special Adviser to the President on EU Affairs [12PDF
  109. Gutzwiller, Felix /SWITZERLAND/ Member of the Swiss Council of States PDF
  110. Halberstadt, Victor /THE NETHERLANDS/ Professor of Economics, Leiden University; Former Honorary Secretary General of Bilderberg Meetings PDF
  111. Hardouvelis, Gikas A. /GREECE/ Chief Economist and Head of Research, Eurobank EFG PDF
  112. Harris, Britt /USA/ CIO, Teacher Retirement System of Texas PDF
  113. Heinonen, Olli /FINLAND/ Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government PDF
  114. Henry, Simon /UK/ CFO, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  115. Hermelin, Paul /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Capgemini Group PDF
  116. Hoffman, Reid /USA/ Co-founder and Executive Chairman, LinkedIn PDF
  117. Hommen, Jan H.M. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman, ING Group PDF
  118. Hormats, Robert D. /USA/ Under Secretary for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs PDF
  119. Huang, Yiping /CHINA/ Professor of Economics, China Center for Economic Research, Peking University PDF
  120. Hughes, Chris R. /USA/ Co-founder, Facebook PDF
  121. Huntsman, Jr., Jon M. /USA/ Chairman, Huntsman Cancer Foundation PDF
  122. Huyghebaert, Jan /BELGIUM/ Chairman of the Board of Directors, KBC Group PDF
  123. Ischinger, Wolfgang /GERMANY/ Chairman, Munich Security Conference; Global Head Government Relations, Allianz SE PDF
  124. Isla, Pablo /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, Inditex GroupPDF
  125. Ivanov, Igor S. /RUSSIA/ Associate member, Russian Academy of Science; President, Russian International Affairs Council PDF
  126. Jacobs, Kenneth M. /USA/ Chairman & CEO, LazardPDF
  127. Janom Steiner, Barbara /SWITZERLAND/ Head of the Department of Justice, Security and Health, Canton Grisons PDF
  128. Johansson, Ole /FINLAND/ Chairman, Confederation of the Finnish Industries EK PDF
  129. Johnson, James A. /USA/ Vice Chairman, Perseus, LLCPDF
  130. Jordan, Thomas J. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman of the Governing Board, Swiss National Bank PDF
  131. Jordan, Jr., Vernon E. /USA/ Senior Managing Director, Lazard Frères & Co. LLC PDF
  132. Kaplan, Robert D. /USA/ Chief Geopolitical Analyst, Stratfor PDF
  133. Karp, Alexander /USA/ CEO, Palantir TechnologiesPDF
  134. Karsner, Alexander /USA/ Executive Chairman, Manifest Energy, Inc PDF
  135. Karvar, Anousheh /FRANCE/ Inspector, Inter-ministerial Audit and Evaluation Office for Social, Health, Employment and Labor Policies PDF
  136. Kasparov, Garry /RUSSIA/ Chairman, United Civil Front (of Russia) PDF
  137. Katainen, Jyrki /FINLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  138. Keane, John M. /USA/ Senior Partner, SCP PartnersPDF
  139. Kerr, John /UK/ Member, House of Lords; Deputy Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell plc. PDF
  140. Kerry, John /USA/ Senator for Massachusetts PDF
  141. Keyman, E. Fuat /TURKEY/ Director, Istanbul Policy Center and Professor of International Relations, Sabanci University PDF
  142. King Philippe of Belgium PDF
  143. Kissinger, Henry A. /USA/ Chairman, Kissinger Associates, Inc. PDF
  144. Kleinfeld, Klaus /USA/ Chairman and CEO, Alcoa PDF
  145. Knot, Klaas H.W. /THE NETHERLANDS/ President, De Nederlandsche Bank PDF
  146. Koç, Mustafa V. /TURKEY/ Chairman, Koç Holding A.Ş.PDF
  147. Koch, Roland /GERMANY/ CEO, Bilfinger Berger SEPDF
  148. Kodmani, Bassma /SYRIA/ Member of the Executive Bureau and Head of Foreign Affairs, Syrian National Council PDF
  149. Kravis, Henry R. /USA/ Founding Partner, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. PDF
  150. Kravis, Marie-Josée /USA/ Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, Inc. PDF
  151. Kroes, Neelie /THE NETHERLANDS/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  152. Krupp, Fred /USA/ President, Environmental Defense Fund PDF
  153. Kudelski, André /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman and CEO, Kudelski Group SA PDF
  154. Kyriacopoulos, Ulysses /GREECE/ Chairman, S&B Industrial Minerals S.A. PDF
  155. Lambert, Richard /UK/ Independent Non-Executive Director, Ernst & Young PDF
  156. Lamy, Pascal /FRANCE/ Director General, World Trade Organization PDF
  157. Lander, Eric S. /USA/ President and Director, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT PDF
  158. Lauk, Kurt J. /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Economic Council to the CDU, Berlin PDF
  159. Lauvergeon, Anne /FRANCE/ Chairman of the Executive Board, AREVA PDF
  160. León Gross, Bernardino /SPAIN/ Secretary General, Office of the Prime Minister PDF
  161. Lessig, Lawrence /USA/ Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership, Harvard Law School; Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard UniversityPDF
  162. Letta, Enrico /ITALY/ Deputy Leader, Democratic Party (PD) PDF
  163. Leuthard, Doris /SWITZERLAND/ Federal CouncillorPDF
  164. Levite, Ariel E. /ISRAEL/ Nonresident Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace PDF
  165. Lévy, Maurice /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Publicis Groupe S.A. PDF
  166. Leysen, Thomas /BELGIUM/ Chairman, Umicore, Chairman of the Board of Directors, KBC Group PDF
  167. Li, Cheng /USA/ Senior Fellow and Director of Research, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution PDF
  168. Lindner, Christian /GERMANY/ Party Leader, Free Democratic Party (FDP NRW) PDF
  169. Lipsky, John /USA/ Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Johns Hopkins University PDF
  170. Liveris, Andrew N. /USA/ President, Chairman and CEO, The Dow Chemical Company PDF
  171. Löfven, Stefan /SWEDEN/ Party Leader, Social Democratic Party (SAP) PDF
  172. Löscher, Peter /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Board of Management, Siemens AG PDF
  173. Lynn, William J. /USA/ Chairman and CEO, DRS Technologies, Inc. PDF
  174. Magnus, Birger /NORWAY/ Chairman, Storebrand ASA PDF
  175. Mandelson, Peter /UK/ Member, House of Lords; Chairman, Global Counsel PDF
  176. Mansbridge, Peter /CANADA/ Chief Correspondent, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation PDF
  177. Mathews, Jessica T. /USA/ President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace PDF
  178. McDowell, Michael /IRELAND/ Senior Counsel, Law Library; Former Deputy Prime Minister PDF
  179. Mchangama, Jacob /DENMARK/ Director of Legal Affairs, Center for Political Studies (CEPOS) PDF
  180. McKenna, Frank /CANADA/ Deputy Chair, TD Bank Financial Group PDF
  181. Mehlman, Kenneth B. /USA/ Partner, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. PDF
  182. Micklethwait, John /UK/ Editor-in-Chief, The Economist PDF
  183. Montbrial, Thierry de /FRANCE/ President, French Institute for International Relations PDF
  184. Monti, Mario /ITALY/ President, Universita Commerciale Luigi Bocconi PDF
  185. Mordashov, Alexey A. /RUSSIA/ CEO, Severstal PDF
  186. Moreira da Silva, Jorge /PORTUGAL/ First Vice-President, Partido Social Democrata (PSD) PDF
  187. Moyo, Dambisa F. /ZAMBIA/ Economist and AuthorPDF
  188. Mundie, Craig J. /USA/ Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Microsoft Corporation PDF
  189. Myklebust, Egil /NORWAY/ Former Chairman of the Board of Directors SAS, Norsk Hydro ASA PDF
  190. Nagel, Alberto /ITALY/ CEO, Mediobanca PDF
  191. Naím, Moisés /USA/ Editor-in-Chief, Foreign PolicyPDF
  192. Nass, Matthias /GERMANY/ Chief International Correspondent, Die Zeit PDF
  193. Ng, Andrew Y. /USA/ Co-Founder, Coursera PDF
  194. Nin Génova, Juan María /SPAIN/ President and CEO, La Caixa PDF
  195. Nogueira Leite, António /PORTUGAL/ Member of the Board, José de Mello Investimentos, SGPS, SA PDF
  196. Noonan, Michael /IRELAND/ Minister for Finance PDF
  197. Noonan, Peggy /USA/ Author, Columnist, The Wall Street Journal PDF
  198. Nyrup Rasmussen, Poul /DENMARK/ Former Prime Minister PDF
  199. Oldham, John /UK/ National Clinical Lead for Quality and Productivity PDF
  200. Ollila, Jorma /FINLAND/ Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  201. Omand, David /UK/ Visiting Professor, King’s College London PDF
  202. Orbinski, James /CANADA/ Professor of Medicine and Political Science, University of Toronto PDF
  203. Orszag, Peter R. /USA/ Director, Office of Management and Budget PDF
  204. Osborne, George /UK/ Chancellor of the ExchequerPDF
  205. Ottersen, Ole Petter /NORWAY/ Rector, University of Oslo PDF
  206. Ottolenghi, Emanuele /USA/ Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies PDF
  207. Özel, Soli /TURKEY/ Senior Lecturer, Kadir Has University; Columnist, Habertürk Newspaper PDF
  208. Özilhan, Tuncay /TURKEY/ Chairman, Anadolu GroupPDF
  209. Papaconstantinou, George (Papakonstantinou, Giorgos) /GREECE/ Minister of Finance PDF
  210. Papahelas, Alexis /GREECE/ Executive Editor, Kathimerini Newspaper PDF
  211. Papalexopoulos, Dimitri /GREECE/ Managing Director, Titan Cement Co. PDF
  212. Parker, Sean /USA/ Managing Partner, Founders Fund PDF
  213. Pavey, Şafak /TURKEY/ Member of Parliament (CHP)PDF
  214. Pechtold, Alexander /THE NETHERLANDS/ Parliamentary Leader, Democrats ’66 (D66) PDF
  215. Pécresse, Valérie /FRANCE/ Member of Parliament (UMP) PDF
  216. Pekin, Şefika /TURKEY/ Founding Partner, Pekin & Bayar Law Firm [12PDF
  217. Pentikäinen, Mikael /FINLAND/ Publisher and Senior Editor-in-Chief, Helsingin Sanomat PDF
  218. Perle, Richard N. /USA/ Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research PDF
  219. Petraeus, David H. /USA/ General, U.S. Army (Retired)PDF
  220. Polanco, Ignacio /SPAIN/ Chairman, Grupo PRISAPDF
  221. Polman, Paul /THE NETHERLANDS/ CEO, Unilever PLCPDF
  222. Portas, Paulo /PORTUGAL/ Minister of State and Foreign Affairs PDF
  223. Prichard, J. Robert S. /CANADA/ President and CEO, Metrolinx PDF
  224. Prince Haakon of Norway PDF
  225. Princess Beatrix of the Netherlands PDF
  226. Queen Sofía of Spain PDF
  227. Rabinovich, Itamar /ISRAEL/ Global Distinguished Professor, New York University PDF
  228. Rachman, Gideon /UK/ Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, The Financial Times PDF
  229. Ramanantsoa, Bernard /FRANCE/ Dean, HEC Paris Group PDF
  230. Rangel, Paulo /PORTUGAL/ Member, European Parliament PDF
  231. Rattner, Steven /USA/ Chairman, Willett Advisors LLCPDF
  232. Redford, Alison M. /CANADA/ Premier of Alberta PDF
  233. Reding, Viviane /LUXEMBOURG/ Vice President and Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship, European Commission PDF
  234. Reisman, Heather M. /CANADA/ Chair and CEO, Indigo Books & Music Inc. PDF
  235. Reitzle, Wolfgang /GERMANY/ CEO & President, Linde AG PDF
  236. Renström, Lars /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Alfa Laval PDF
  237. Rey, Hélène /FRANCE/ Professor of Economics, London Business School PDF
  238. Rinnooy Kan, Alexander H.G. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman, Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER) PDF
  239. Robertson, Simon /UK/ Partner, Robertson Robey Associates LLP; Deputy Chairman, HSBC HoldingsPDF
  240. Rocca, Gianfelice /ITALY/ Chairman, Techint PDF
  241. Rockefeller, David /USA/ Former Chairman, Chase Manhattan Bank PDF
  242. Rodriguez Inciarte, Matías /SPAIN/ Executive Vice Chairman, Grupo Santander PDF
  243. Rogoff, Kenneth S. /USA/ Professor of Economics, Harvard University PDF
  244. Rompuy, Herman van /BELGIUM/ President, European Council PDF
  245. Rose, Charlie /USA/ Producer, Rose CommunicationsPDF
  246. Rosenthal, Uri /THE NETHERLANDS/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  247. Ross, Dennis B. /USA/ Counselor, Washington Institute for Near East Policy PDF
  248. Rostowski, Jacek /POLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  249. Roy, Olivier /FRANCE/ Professor of Social and Political Theory, European University Institute PDF
  250. Rubin, Robert E. /USA/ Co-Chairman, Council on Foreign Relations; Former Secretary of the TreasuryPDF
  251. Rutte, Mark /THE NETHERLANDS/ Prime Minister PDF
  252. Sabanci Dinçer, Suzan /TURKEY/ Chairman, AkbankPDF
  253. Sáenz de Santamaría Antón, Soraya /SPAIN/ Vice President and Minister for the Presidency PDF
  254. Scaroni, Paolo /ITALY/ CEO, Eni S.p.A. PDF
  255. Scheffer, Paul /THE NETHERLANDS/ Professor of European Studies, Tilburg University PDF
  256. Schieder, Andreas /AUSTRIA/ State Secretary of Finance PDF
  257. Schmid, Martin /SWITZERLAND/ President, Government of the Canton Grisons PDF
  258. Schmidt, Eric /USA/ CEO and Chairman of the Board, Google PDF
  259. Scholten, Rudolf /AUSTRIA/ Member of the Board of Executive Directors, Oesterreichische Kontrollbank AG PDF
  260. Scholz, Olaf /GERMANY/ Vice Chairman, SPD PDF
  261. Schütze, Peter /DENMARK/ Member of the Executive Management, Nordea Bank AB PDF
  262. Schweiger, Rolf /SWITZERLAND/ Member of the Swiss Council of States PDF
  263. Seguro, António José /PORTUGAL/ Secretary General, Socialist Party PDF
  264. Senard, Jean-Dominique /FRANCE/ CEO, Michelin Group PDF
  265. Shambaugh, David /USA/ Director, China Policy Program, George Washington University PDF
  266. Sheeran, Josette /USA/ Executive Director, United Nations World Food Programme PDF
  267. Siilasmaa, Risto /FINLAND/ Chairman of the Board of Directors, Nokia Corporation PDF
  268. Skogen Lund, Kristin /NORWAY/ Director General, Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise PDF
  269. Slaughter, Anne-Marie /USA/ Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University PDF
  270. Soiron, Rolf /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman of the Board, Holcim Ltd., Lonza Ltd. PDF
  271. Solana Madariaga, Javier /SPAIN/ Former Secretary General, Council of the European Union PDF
  272. Solberg, Erna /NORWAY/ Leader of the Conservative Party PDF
  273. Speyer, Jerry I. /USA/ Chairman and Co-CEO, Tishman Speyer PDF
  274. Steinberg, James B. /USA/ Deputy Secretary of StatePDF
  275. Steinbrück, Peer /GERMANY/ Member of the Bundestag; Former Minister of Finance PDF
  276. Stewart, Rory /UK/ Member of Parliament PDF
  277. Stigson, Björn /SWEDEN/ President, World Business Council for Sustainable Development PDF
  278. Summers, Lawrence H. /USA/ Director, National Economic Council PDF
  279. Supino, Pietro /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman and Publisher, Tamedia AG PDF
  280. Sutherland, Peter D. /IRELAND/ Chairman, Goldman Sachs International PDF
  281. Taylor, J. Martin /UK/ Chairman, Syngenta International AG PDF
  282. Teixeira dos Santos, Fernando /PORTUGAL/ Minister of State and Finance PDF
  283. Thiam, Tidjane /UK – IVORY COAST/ Group CEO, Prudential plc PDF
  284. Thiel, Peter A. /USA/ President, Clarium Capital Management, LLC PDF
  285. Thompson, Craig B. /USA/ President and CEO, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center PDF
  286. Timuray, Serpil /TURKEY/ CEO, Vodafone Turkey PDF
  287. Topsøe, Jakob Haldor /DENMARK/ Partner, AMBROX Capital A/S PDF
  288. Tremonti, Giulio /ITALY/ Minister of Economy and Finance PDF
  289. Trichet, Jean-Claude /FRANCE/ President, European Central Bank PDF
  290. Trittin, Jürgen /GERMANY/ Parliamentary Leader, Alliance 90/The Greens PDF
  291. Tsoukalis, Loukas /GREECE/ President, ELIAMEP PDF
  292. Tumpel-Gugerell, Gertrude /AUSTRIA/ Member of the Executive Board, European Central Bank PDF
  293. Urpilainen, Jutta /FINLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  294. Varney, Christine A. /USA/ Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust PDF
  295. Vasella, Daniel L. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Novartis AG PDF
  296. Vaupel, James W. /USA/ Founding Director, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research PDF
  297. Vimont, Pierre /FRANCE/ Executive Secretary General, European External Action Service PDF
  298. Volcker, Paul A. /USA/ Chairman, Economic Recovery Advisory Board PDF
  299. Voser, Peter /UK – SWITZERLAND/ CEO, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  300. Wahlroos, Björn /FINLAND/ Chairman, Sampo plcPDF
  301. Waldvogel, Francis A. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Novartis Venture Fund PDF
  302. Wall, Brad /CANADA/ Premier of Saskatchewan PDF
  303. Wallenberg, Jacob /SWEDEN/ Chairman, Investor ABPDF
  304. Warsh, Kevin /USA/ Former Governor, Federal Reserve Board PDF
  305. Wellink, Nout /THE NETHERLANDS/ President, De Nederlandsche Bank PDF
  306. West, F.J. Bing /USA/ Author PDF
  307. Weston, Galen G. /CANADA/ Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited PDF
  308. Williams of Crosby, Shirley /UK/ Member, House of Lords PDF
  309. Winter, Jaap W. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Partner, De Brauw Blackstone Westbroek PDF
  310. Witmer, Jürg /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Givaudan SA and Clariant AG PDF
  311. Wolf, Martin H. /UK/ Chief Economics Commentator, The Financial Times PDF
  312. Wolfensohn, James D. /USA/ Chairman, Wolfensohn & Company, LLC PDF
  313. Wooldridge, Adrian D. /UK/ Business Correspondent, The Economist PDF
  314. Wright, Nigel S. /CANADA/ Chief of Staff, Office of the Prime Minister PDF
  315. Yergin, Daniel /USA/ Chairman, IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates PDF
  316. Zapatero, José Luis Rodríguez /SPAIN/ Prime MinisterPDF
  317. Zetsche, Dieter /GERMANY/ Chairman, Daimler AGPDF
  318. Zoellick, Robert B. /USA/ President, The World Bank Group PDF

MR M.J. MEIJER C.S

Notarial Firm for Bilderberg (123456)

  1. Borren, Hans [12] /Chairman Mr M.J. Meijer c.s/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  2. Meijer, Maarten R. [123] /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

VIRTUAL BUILDING BV (Virtualbuilding.nl)

Website Service Provider for Bilderberg (12)

  1. Rademaker, Ron [1234] /Founder Virtual Building BV/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

CONNECT HOLLAND BV (Connectholland.nl)

(Former) Website Service Provider for Bilderberg (1)

  1. Soeterbroek, Jeroen [12345] /Founder Connect Holland BV/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

CFR

  1. Hills, Carla A. /USA/ PDF
  2. Rubenstein, David Mark /USA/ PDF
  3. Haass, Richard Nathan /USA/ PDF
  4. Abizaid, John P. /USA/ PDF
  5. Ackerman, Peter /USA/ PDF
  6. Albright, Madeleine K. /USA/ PDF
  7. Baird, Zoë /USA/ PDF
  8. Blinder, Alan S. /USA/ PDF
  9. Boies, Mary McInnis /USA/ PDF
  10. Bradley, David G. /USA/ PDF
  11. Brokaw, Tom /USA/ PDF
  12. Burns, R. Nicholas /USA/ PDF
  13. Denning, Steven A. /USA/ PDF
  14. Fink, Laurence D. /USA/ PDF
  15. Friedman, Stephen /USA/ PDF
  16. Fudge, Ann M. [2] /USA/ PDF
  17. Gann, Pamela /USA/ PDF
  18. Glocer, Thomas H. /USA/ PDF
  19. Henry, Peter B. /USA/ PDF
  20. Hill, J. Tomilson /USA/ PDF
  21. Hrinak, Donna J. /USA/ PDF
  22. Jackson, Shirley Ann /USA/ PDF
  23. Kent, Muhtar /USA/ PDF
  24. Miscik, Jami /USA/ PDF
  25. Owens, James W. /USA/ PDF
  26. Padrón, Eduardo J. /USA/ PDF
  27. Peterson, Peter G. /USA/ PDF
  28. Porat, Ruth /USA/ PDF
  29. Smith, Frederick W. /USA/ PDF
  30. Warner, Margaret /USA/ PDF
  31. Weber, Vin /USA/ PDF
  32. Whitman, Christine Todd /USA/ PDF
  33. Zakaria, Fareed /USA/ PDF
  34. Olson, Keith [photo unconfirmed!] /USA/ PDF
  35. Lindsay, James M. /USA/ PDF
  36. Faskianos, Irina A. /USA/ PDF
  37. Gelb, Leslie H. /USA/ PDF
  38. Greenberg, Maurice R. /USA/ PDF
  39. Annan, Kofi /GHANA – USA/ PDF
  40. Belo-Osagie, Hakeem /NIGERIA/ PDF
  41. Desmarais Jr., Paul /CANADA/ PDF
  42. Döpfner, Mathias /GERMANY/ PDF
  43. Carbajal, José Antonio Fernández /MEXICO/ PDF
  44. Halonen, Tarja /FINLAND/ PDF
  45. Ibrahim, Mohamed /SUDAN – UK/ PDF
  46. Jameel, Mohammed Abdul Latif /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  47. Kelly, Gail /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  48. Kojima, Yorihiko /JAPAN/ PDF
  49. Mahindra, Anand /INDIA/ PDF
  50. Mansour, Mohamed /EGYPT/ PDF
  51. de Margerie, Christophe /FRANCE/ PDF
  52. Masiyiwa, Strive /ZIMBABWE/ PDF
  53. Ofer, Idan /ISRAEL/ PDF
  54. Olayan, Lubna /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  55. Potanin, Vladimir /RUSSIA/ PDF
  56. Powell, Charles David /UK/ PDF
  57. Walujo, Patrick /INDONESIA/ PDF
  58. Xin, Zhang /CHINA/ PDF

NATO

  1. RasmussenAnders Fogh /DENMARK/ PDF
  2. VershbowAlexander /USA/ PDF
  3. LungescuOana /BELGIUM – ROMANIA/ PDF
  4. Høeg-JensenKasper /DENMARK/ PDF
  5. StamatopoulosThrasyvoulos Terry /GREECE/ PDF
  6. DucaruSorin /ROMANIA/ PDF
  7. AuroyPatrick /FRANCE/ PDF
  8. BraussHeinrich /GERMANY/ PDF
  9. BushWayne J. /USA/ PDF
  10. Grabar-KitarovićKolinda /CROATIA/ PDF
  11. EvansStephen /UK/ PDF
  12. SmithStephen F. /USA/ PDF
  13. HillSteven /USA/ PDF
  14. ChagnotStéphane /FRANCE/ PDF

EU

  1. AshtonCatherine /UK/ PDF
  2. KallasSiim /ESTONIA/ PDF
  3. Tajani, Antonio /ITALY – FRANCE/ PDF
  4. Šefčovič, Maroš /SLOVAKIA/ PDF
  5. Rehn, Olli /FINLAND/ PDF
  6. Potočnik, Janez /SLOVENIA/ PDF
  7. Piebalgs, Andris /LATVIA/ PDF
  8. Barnier, Michel /FRANCE/ PDF
  9. Vassiliou, Androulla /CYPRUS/ PDF
  10. Šemeta, Algirdas /LITHUANIA/ PDF
  11. Geoghegan-Quinn, Máire /IRELAND/ PDF
  12. Lewandowski, Janusz /POLAND/ PDF
  13. Damanaki, Maria /GREECE/ PDF
  14. Georgieva, Kristalina /BULGARIA/ PDF
  15. Oettinger, Günther /GERMANY/ PDF
  16. Hahn, Johannes /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  17. Hedegaard, Connie /DENMARK/ PDF
  18. Füle, Štefan /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  19. Andor, László /HUNGARY/ PDF
  20. Malmström, Cecilia /BELGIUM – SWEDEN/ PDF
  21. Cioloş, Dacian /ROMANIA/ PDF
  22. Borg, Tonio /MALTA/ PDF
  23. Mimica, Neven /CROATIA/ PDF
  24. Guy Verhofstadt /BELGIUM – ITALY/ PDF
  25. Draghi, Mario /ITALY/ PDF
  26. Constâncio, Vítor Manuel Ribeiro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  27. Cœuré, Benoît /FRANCE/ PDF
  28. Lautenschläger, Sabine /GERMANY/ PDF
  29. Mersch, Yves /LUXEMBOURG/ PDF
  30. Praet, Peter /BELGIUM/ PDF
  31. O’Mahoney, John [12] /IRELAND/ PDF
  32. Esteban Perez, Francisco /SPAIN/ PDF
  33. Bolkestein, Frederik /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  34. de Hoop Scheffer, Jakob Gijsbert /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

OSCE

  1. Krivokapic, Ranko /MONTENEGRO/ PDF
  2. Burkhalter, Didier /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  3. Voridis, Makis /GREECE/ PDF
  4. Guliyev, Azay /AZERBAIJAN/ PDF
  5. Kauma, Pia /FINLAND/ PDF
  6. Aknazarova, Roza /KYRGYZSTAN/ PDF
  7. Sena, Nilza /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  8. Williams, Roger /UK/ PDF
  9. Santos, Isabel /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  10. Kulkuloglu, Mehmet Sevki /TURKEY/ PDF
  11. Comic, Gordana /SERBIA/ PDF

AIPAC

  1. Kohr, Howard /USA/ PDF
  2. Fishman, Richard /USA/ PDF
  3. Kern, Chrystal [1234] /USA/ PDF

ADL

  1. FoxmanAbraham H. /USA/ PDF
  2. Curtiss-LusherBarry /USA/ PDF

CFI

  1. Polak, Stuart [12] /UK/ PDF
  2. Tamam, Nathalie [12] /UK/ PDF
  3. Gurd, James [12] /UK/ PDF
  4. Stark, Leetal [12] /UK/ PDF
  5. Akademir, Sedef [1 ,23] /UK/ PDF
  6. Murkes, Tanyah [123] /ISRAEL/ PDF

BICOM

  1. Zabludowicz, Chaim Poju [12] /UK/ PDF
  2. Kehoe, Dermot /UK/ PDF
  3. Fineberg, Tony /UK/ PDF
  4. Pater, Richard /ISRAEL/ PDF

MAGNA BSP

  1. Siboni, Haim /ISRAEL/ PDF

AIJAC

  1. Leibler, Marc /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  2. Keen, Paul /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  3. Rubenstein, Colin /AUSTRALIA/ PDF

OSF

  1. Soros, George /USA/ PDF
  2. Stone, Christopher /USA/ PDF

RIT CAPITAL PARTNERS

  1. Rothschild, Nathaniel Charles Jacob [123] /UK/ PDF

GENEL ENERGY

  1. Rothschild, Nathaniel Philip Victor James [12] /SWITZERLAND – UK/ PDF

TRILATERAL COMMISSION

  1. Dlouhy, Vladimír /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  2. Fuchs, Michael /GERMANY/ PDF
  3. Nye, Joseph S. Jr. /USA/ PDF
  4. Prentice, Jim /CANADA/ PDF
  5. Serra, Jaime /MEXICO/ PDF
  6. Hasegawa, Yasuchika /JAPAN/ PDF
  7. Seok-hyun, Hong /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  8. Wanandi, Jusuf /INDONESIA/ PDF

PEKING UNIVERSITY

  • Strong, Maurice F. [123]/CHINA/ PDF

(FORMER) HEADS OF STATE / GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS

  1. BushGeorge H. W. /USA/ PDF
  2. ClintonWilliam J. /USA/ PDF
  3. Clinton, Hillary Diane Rodham /USA/ PDF
  4. BushGeorge W. /USA/ PDF
  5. ObamaBarack H. /USA/ PDF
  6. PeresShimon /ISRAEL/ PDF
  7. NetanyahuBenjamin /ISRAEL/ PDF
  8. Queen Elizabeth Alexandra Mary /UK/ PDF
  9. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales /UK/ PDF
  10. Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh /UK/ PDF
  11. Blair, Tony /UK/ PDF
  12. Di RupoElio /BELGIUM/ PDF
  13. HarperStephen /CANADA/ PDF
  14. Queen Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid/DENMARK/ PDF
  15. Thorning-Schmidt, Helle /DENMARK/ PDF
  16. Sarkozy, Nicolas /FRANCE/ PDF
  17. Hollande, François /FRANCE/ PDF
  18. Valls, Manuel /FRANCE/ PDF
  19. Ayrault, Jean-Marc /FRANCE/ PDF
  20. Napolitano, Giorgio /ITALY/ PDF
  21. Renzi, Matteo /ITALY/ PDF
  22. Berlusconi, Silvio /ITALY/ PDF
  23. King Harald V /NORWAY/ PDF
  24. Stoltenberg, Jens /NORWAY/ PDF
  25. Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani /QATAR/ PDF
  26. Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani/QATAR/ PDF
  27. Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias /SPAIN/ PDF
  28. Rajoy Brey, Mariano /SPAIN/ PDF
  29. Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands PDF
  30. Gusenbauer, Alfred /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  31. Kamov, Nikolai /BULGARIA/ PDF
  32. Harris, Mike /CANADA/ PDF
  33. Lord, Bernard /CANADA/ PDF
  34. Chrétien, Joseph Jacques Jean /CANADA/ PDF
  35. Martin, Paul Edgar Philippe /CANADA/ PDF
  36. Heinäluoma, Eero Olavi /FINLAND/ PDF
  37. Niinistö, Sauli Väinämö /FINLAND/ PDF
  38. Vanhanen, Matti Taneli /FINLAND/ PDF
  39. Westerwelle, Guido /GERMANY/ PDF
  40. Schmidt, Helmut Heinrich Waldemar /GERMANY/PDF
  41. Merkel, Angela Dorothea /GERMANY/ PDF
  42. Fischer, Joseph Martin Joschka /GERMANY/ PDF
  43. Alogoskoufis, George /GREECE/ PDF
  44. Bakoyannis, Dora /GREECE/ PDF
  45. Diamantopoulou, Anna /GREECE/ PDF
  46. Stournaras, Yiannis /GREECE/ PDF
  47. Papathanasiou, Yannis /GREECE/ PDF
  48. Bjarnason, Björn /ICELAND/ PDF
  49. Oddsson, Davíð /ICELAND/ PDF
  50. Haarde, Geir Hilmar /ICELAND/ PDF
  51. Sigurðsson, Jón /ICELAND/ PDF
  52. Gleeson, Dermot /IRELAND/ PDF
  53. Noonan, Michael /IRELAND/ PDF
  54. Bonino, Emma /ITALY/ PDF
  55. Tanaka, Nobuo /JAPAN/ PDF
  56. Lubbers, Ruud /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  57. Kok, Wim /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  58. Balkenende, Jan Peter /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  59. Verhagen, Maxime Jacques Marcel /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  60. Jensen, Siv /NORWAY/ PDF
  61. Clemet, Kristin /NORWAY/ PDF
  62. de Pinho, Manuel António Gomes de Almeida/PORTUGAL/ PDF
  63. Sócrates Carvalho Pinto de Sousa, José /PORTUGAL/PDF
  64. Aguiar-Branco, José Pedro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  65. de Santana Lopes, Pedro Miguel /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  66. Sarmento, Nuno Morais /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  67. da Costa, António Luís dos Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  68. Rio, Rui Fernando da Silva /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  69. Leite, Maria Manuela Dias Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  70. Silva, Augusto Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  71. de Sousa, Marcelo Rebelo /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  72. Guterres, António Manuel de Oliveira /PORTUGAL/PDF
  73. Rodrigues, Eduardo Luís Barreto Ferro /PORTUGAL/PDF
  74. de Sampaio, Jorge Fernando Branco /PORTUGAL/PDF
  75. Amaral, Luís Mira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  76. Constâncio, Vítor Manuel Ribeiro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  77. Ferreira, José Medeiros /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  78. do Amaral, Joaquim Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  79. Barreto, António Miguel de Morais /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  80. Cravinho, João Cardona Gomes /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  81. Nabo, Francisco Luís Murteira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  82. Olechowski, Andrzej Marian /POLAND/ PDF
  83. Suchocka, Hanna /POLAND/ PDF
  84. Moratinos Cuyaubé, Miguel Ángel /SPAIN/ PDF
  85. Solbes Mira, Pedro /SPAIN/ PDF
  86. Fälldin, Nils Olof Thorbjörn /SWEDEN/ PDF
  87. Olofsson, Maud Elisabeth /SWEDEN/ PDF
  88. Reinfeldt, John Fredrik /SWEDEN/ PDF
  89. Sahlin, Mona Ingeborg /SWEDEN/ PDF
  90. Blocher, Christoph /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  91. Ashdown, Paddy /UK/ PDF
  92. Carington, Peter Alexander Rupert /UK/ PDF
  93. Gascoyne-Cecil, Robert Michael James /UK/ PDF
  94. Healey, Denis Winston /UK/ PDF
  95. Monks, John Stephen /UK/ PDF
  96. Owen, David Anthony Llewellyn /UK/ PDF
  97. Rifkind, Malcolm Leslie /UK/ PDF
  98. Hannay, David Hugh Alexander /UK/ PDF
  99. Brown, Gordon /UK/ PDF
  100. Berger, Samuel Richard /USA/ PDF
  101. Geithner, Timothy Franz /USA/ PDF
  102. Hamilton, Lee Herbert /USA/ PDF
  103. Powell, Colin Luther /USA/ PDF
  104. Rice, Condoleezza /USA/ PDF
  105. Shultz, George Pratt /USA/ PDF
  106. Daschle, Thomas Andrew /USA/ PDF
  107. Edwards, Johnny Reid /USA/ PDF
  108. Hagel, Charles Timothy /USA/ PDF
  109. Nunn, Samuel Augustus Jr. /USA/ PDF
  110. Perry, James Richard /USA/ PDF
  111. Sanford, Marshall Clement Jr. /USA/ PDF
  112. Sebelius, Kathleen /USA/ PDF
  113. Arapoglou, Takis /GREECE/ PDF
  114. McDonough, William Joseph /USA/ PDF
  115. Bernanke, Ben Shalom /USA/ PDF
  116. Yousfi, Youcef /ALGERIA/ PDF
  117. Boudou, Amado /ARGENTINA/ PDF
  118. Sargsyan, Serzh /ARMENIA/ PDF
  119. Bishop, Julie /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  120. Aliyev, Ilham /AZERBAIJAN/ PDF
  121. Temer, Michel /BRAZIL/ PDF
  122. Valenzuela, Heraldo Muñoz /CHILE/ PDF
  123. Jinping, Xi /CHINA/ PDF
  124. Bělobrádek, Pavel /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  125. Loza, Hamdi Sanad /EGYPT/ PDF
  126. Ondimba, Ali Bongo /GABON/ PDF
  127. Garibashvili, Irakli /GEORGIA/ PDF
  128. Martonyi, János /HUNGARY/ PDF
  129. Khurshid, Salman /INDIA/ PDF
  130. Boediono /INDONESIA/ PDF
  131. Noble, Ronald Kenneth /USA/ PDF
  132. Steinitz, Yuval /ISRAEL/ PDF
  133. Abe, Shinzō /JAPAN/ PDF
  134. ibn al-Hussein, Abdullah II /JORDAN/ PDF
  135. Nazarbayev, Nursultan Äbishuly /KAZAKHSTAN/ PDF
  136. Grybauskaitė, Dalia /LITHUANIA/ PDF
  137. bin Yassin, Muhyiddin /MALAYSIA/ PDF
  138. Gómez-Robledo, Juan Manuel /MEXICO/ PDF
  139. Mezouar, Salaheddine /MOROCCO/ PDF
  140. Key, John Phillip /NEW ZEALAND/ PDF
  141. Jonathan, Goodluck Ebele Azikiwe /NIGERIA/ PDF
  142. Sharif, Mian Muhammad Nawaz /PAKISTAN/ PDF
  143. Sikorski, Radosław Tomasz /POLAND/ PDF
  144. Băsescu, Traian /ROMANIA/ PDF
  145. Lavrov, Sergey Viktorovich /RUSSIA/ PDF
  146. Yamani, Hashim [12] /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  147. Hsien Loong, Lee /SINGAPORE/ PDF
  148. Nkoana-Mashabane, Maite Emily /SOUTH AFRICA/PDF
  149. Geun-hye, Park /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  150. Phuangketkeow, Sihasak /THAILAND/ PDF
  151. Gül, Abdullah /TURKEY/ PDF
  152. Yatsenyuk, Arseniy Petrovych /UKRAINE/ PDF
  153. bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, Mohammed /ABU DHABI – UAE/ PDF
  154. Nguyễn, Tấn Dũng /VIETNAM/ PDF
  155. Erdoğan, Recep Tayyip /TURKEY/ PDF
  156. Putin, Vladimir /RUSSIA/ PDF
  157. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge /UK/ PDF
  158. Medvedev, Dmitry Anatolyevich /RUSSIA/ PDF
  159. Brzezinski, Zbigniew Kazimierz /USA/ PDF

CATHOLIC CHURCH

  1. Ratzinger, Joseph Aloisius /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  2. Bergoglio, Jorge Mario /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  3. Tauran, Jean-Louis /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  4. von Freyberg, Ernst [12] /VATICAN – ITALY – GERMANY/ PDF
  5. Castelló, Santos Abril y /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  6. Ricca, Battista Mario Salvatore /VATICAN – ITALY/PDF
  7. Marranci, Rolando /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF

RELIGIOUS ZIONIST MOVEMENT

  1. Lior, Dov [12] /ISRAEL/ PDF
  2. Dahan, Eli Ben [12] /ISRAEL/ PDF

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Source.

Lunar eclipse tonight may highlight Draconid meteor shower

Total eclipse starts at 3:15 a.m. PT (6:15 a.m. ET) on Wednesday

CBC News Posted: Oct 07, 2014 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 07, 2014 5:00 AM ET

The moon turned brownish orange earlier this year during this eclipse on April 15, as seen from Los Angeles. The second total lunar eclipse in a series of four takes place early Wednesday morning. (Gene Blevins/Reuters)

The full moon will darken and grow reddish tonight during a total lunar eclipse that may help a fall meteor shower shine.

The edge of the Earth’s shadow will begin to pass over October’s full moon, traditionally called the Hunter’s Moon, at 1:15 a.m. PT or 4:15 a.m. ET. It will cover the moon for a total lunar eclipse starting 3:15 a.m. PT or 6:15 a.m. ET and lasting 59 minutes.

At that time, the moon will darken to a colour that could vary from orange to brown to red. Lunar eclipses are sometimes called blood moons — particularly fitting, perhaps, for a Hunter’s moon shortly before Halloween.

The timing of tonight’s eclipse means that part of it will take place after moonset in Eastern Canada, but Western Canada should get a nice view.

Multiple images of the moon are are seen in this illustration of the phases of the lunar eclipse over Winnipeg on April 15, 2014. A total lunar eclipse occurs when Earth casts its shadow over the moon. The lunar face can sometimes turn reddish, coppery-brown or orange, tinged by light from the sun that refracts as it passes through our atmosphere.

Multiple images of the moon are are seen in this illustration of the phases of the lunar eclipse over Winnipeg on April 15, 2014. A total lunar eclipse occurs when Earth casts its shadow over the moon. The lunar face can sometimes turn reddish, coppery-brown or orange, tinged by light from the sun that refracts as it passes through our atmosphere. (John Woods/Canadian Press)

This particular lunar eclipse could give skywatchers an additional treat, by bringing out the meteors of the Draconid meteor shower, which is expected to peak tonight. The annual fall meteor shower produces relatively few meteors compared to the summer’s Perseids, and the full moon is expected to wash out most of them. But the eclipse will temporarily darken the full moon and the night sky.

“That’s the perfect time to look for meteors,” said J. Randy Attwood, executive director of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

The Draconid meteors will appear to originate from the constellation Draco the Dragon, in the north to northwest sky.

Of course, the main event is still the eclipse.

“I get kind of excited about them because they’re really cool to watch,” Attwood said. “You’re seeing motion in the sky, you’re seeing it slowly creep into the Earth’s shadow.”

The best part is that they don’t require any special knowledge or equipment.

“Anyone who sees the moon can see the eclipse,” he said.

And unlike solar eclipses, they can be viewed without any eye protection.

“It’s perfectly safe to look at an eclipse of the moon with your regular eyes or binoculars.”

Tips for observers

Because the eclipse takes place close to moonset in eastern Canada, Attwood recommends that viewers in eastern provinces scout out a spot with a clear view of the southwest horizon, so that trees and buildings don’t block their view.

Those in Western Canada will get a better view, but will probably need to set an alarm.

He recommends trying to photograph the moon with a zoom lens and, if possible, a tripod.

“Once the eclipse is total, then you may need an exposure of several seconds.”

The reason the moon turns reddish during a lunar eclipse is that during the event, the Earth’s shadow blocks almost all sunlight from hitting the moon. The exception is a small amount of light bent around the Earth by its atmosphere.

The atmosphere scatters most of the blue light, leaving only the red to hit the moon — causing it to appear red.

“It’s the same reason why the sky is blue… and why sunset is red,” Attwood said.

The amount of red colour depends on the weather in the part of the atmosphere the light is passing through, he added. If it’s clear, the moon will be brighter and redder, but if it’s stormy and cloudy, the moon will be darker and more brownish.

The final two total lunar eclipses of this tetrad will take place next April 4 and September 28.

Source.

Ebola Hoax Continues . . .

Hmm . . . Do you think Ebola is being used to scare people into giving up air travel? With an adequate supply of vitamin C and/or colloidal silver, Ebola is nothing to be afraid of. -LW


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Further reading: http://jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/ebolagate-47-questions-and-answers/

Ben Fulford: BIS wishes to keep global central banking system intact after revolution

benjamin_fulford_smile_smirk79In addition to the BIS wanting to stay alive, Fulford points out that the system can outlive George H. W. Bush, and continue to fund the military-industrial complex. In closing, he suggests that it is up to countries like Russia, Canada, and Japan to make sure that BRICS doesn’t fall victim to the banking cartel.

September 30, 2014

The Bank for International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, is angling to keep its central role in world power even if the Federal Reserve Board secret government of the United States in overthrown, according to BIS and MI5 sources. The Swiss claim, with some justification, that they have always been a neutral place for nations to deal with each other, even in times of war. They wish to keep this role as a neutral financial arbiter. The Russians are also trying to position themselves as the conduit between East and West in the event of the fall of the secret government of the West, Russian agents in Japan say.

The real question though, is about who is going to control the secret “trading platforms” that are used by the current rulers of the global financial system to funnel “money” into the world economy. These are now controlled by George Bush Sr. and his Nazi cronies and are what keep the US military industrial complex financed.

Here is what MI5 had to say about the situation:

“The central role of trading platforms in the growth of Nazi corporations and institutions (including CIA One Frankfurt) cannot be understated. It has been the core of world industrial growth for the chosen few. This system is so embedded that institutions such as the Pentagon will not survive without it. There must be some attempt to understand and plan the evolution of this mechanism within the system.”

China is clearly angling to take over from the Federal Reserve Board as the controller of the world’s reserve currency. The BIS want to support China and the BRICS alliance in order to keep much of its financial power intact. As MI5 put it “there is nothing to stop the trading platforms from continuing in operation even after Bush 41 is gone. The printing presses (computer screens) will deal in any currency.”

In other words, the BIS, and the esoterically placed trillionaires behind it, are offering to allow the Chinese yuan to take over from the Fed debt notes (US “dollars”) in exchange for being allowed to keep some control.

The MI5 source said this “transition will be difficult as the trading platforms are the main conduit for channeling debt onto the masses and cash to the chosen ones.”

By “difficult” the source was no doubt referring to the so-called ISIS and Khorasan crisis being pumped up in by the Western propaganda apparatus. This is a veiled threat by the military industrial complex to cut off the world’s oil if they are treated harshly by the incoming regime. The name Khorasan means son of ISIS, that is to say is Horus, whose symbol is the eye on top of the pyramid. In other words, Khorasan represents the owners of the petrodollar system that charges the world high prices for Middle Eastern oil and then deposits that money into cabal controlled banks.

These owners have good reason to be scared into making threats. There is an unstoppable groundswell of discontent in the US at their rule. Although it is not reported much in either the corporate or the alternative media, the legal sharks are getting ready for a feeding frenzy during which they plan to tear apart the big banks. According to the P2 lodge, the Vatican is using its pull to make sure the Supreme Court and the legal system allow these lawsuits to proceed according to the law. Here is a partial list of some of the lawsuits I was able to find just for the state of Illinois:

http://dockets.justia.com/search?query=UBS+AG&state=illinois

The lawyers who made billions suing big tobacco, and many others, are joining this feeding frenzy.

Federal Reserve Board inspector Carmen Segarra, who recorded 45 hours of insider collusion between the New York Fed and Goldman Sachs is part of this ongoing attack by the legal profession against the feds. The resignation of Attorney General Eric Holder has also removed a major obstacle to legal action against the Feds and their Washington D.C. puppets.

Then of course, this week brings the September 30th end of the US corporate governments’ fiscal year so, once again everybody is wondering if the Chinese will finally get the cohones to stop rolling over their debt. This is all the official Chinese Xinhua News Service had to say about it:

“BEIJING Sept. 28 (Xinhua) – Chinese Vice Premier Wang Yang on Sunday held a phone conversation with U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew. They exchanged views on China-U.S. economic relations, the international economic and financial situation and other issues.”

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2014-09/28/c_133680186.htm

Also, last week a representative of the Clinton family (trying to be the friendly face of the cabal) contacted the White Dragon Society asking for the name of a “106 year old Chinese gentleman” who might have access to trillions of dollars. They were told this lead was sure to be a dead end.

Also, in another hint that things are not quite normal, The Hindustan Times, a leading Indian newspaper, said that China and India had not bothered to attend the emergency “climate summit” called by the Western powers last week for various reasons including the fact that:

“Neither the American president, nor the European leaders have the mandate to offer money at the summit.”

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-china-ignore-un-climate-change-summit/article1-1267288.aspx

In other words, all this speech by US Corporate government spokesman Obama at the UN last week did was contribute hot air to so-called global warming:

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/09/23/Obama-Announces-New-Executive-Actions-To-Fight-Climate-Change

Nonetheless, it is best not to get fixated on dates because many September 30th deadlines have come and gone without incident. Even if the payments are missed, the corporate government will have until October 17th to scrounge up the money. CIA sources say the Iranians and Middle Eastern countries will keep the US corporate government going past September in exchange for help in re-establishing a caliphate in the Middle East. In any case, we will soon find out.

It is also clear from Russian and EU news reports that some sort of deal has been struck between the EU, Russia and the Ukraine because Russia has now promised to keep the Ukraine supplied with enough gas to get it over the winter.

http://rt.com/business/190952-gas-talks-russia-berlin/

However, the Russians are demanding criminal investigations into the various mass murder incidents carried out by cabal mercenaries in the Ukraine. This will lead, no doubt, to senior cabal leaders in the US, Israel and Europe. Personally, I would not like to be in Zbigniew “it is easier to kill a million people than to convince them” Brzezinski’s shoes right now.

In Asia too, there are signs of change. Japanese slave Prime Minister Shinzo Abe suddenly pretended his Davos speech calling for a world war against China never happened when he talked peace at the UN last week. Also, Japan’s government has decided to postpone its unpopular moves to revise defense guidelines with the US until 2015. It appears the Japanese government has seen the writing on the wall and expects the current US regime might not last until then. There is also the fact that many very dangerous people in Japan are upset that Abe reads from scripts provided to him by Nazis like Richard Armitage and Michael Green instead of acting in the interests of his people.

The Japanese are also waking up to what really happened in Fukushima on March 11th, 2011. An official at Japan’s Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry (Meti), who was in the department in charge of energy policy at the time of the nuclear and tsunami terror attack, says he visited Fukushima recently and “found nothing there.” He said much touted plans to build a giant “ice wall” to stop radioactive water from flowing into the ocean were just a scam by a large construction company to make money. Whatever radioactivity there was in the region appears to have been washed into the ocean, he says. Japan has also decided to ignore the cabal radiation fear campaign and restart its nuclear reactors in order to reduce its dependence on cabal controlled Middle Eastern oil, the source said.

The sudden deadly eruption of Japan’s second largest volcano last week may have been cabal payback. Time will tell. Even if it was, however, the cabalists know that use of such weapons is a two-way street and invites retaliation.

The North Korean regime is also going off the old “Asian boogeyman” script with a representative saying his government will allow UN human rights inspectors into his country provided they do not come from hostile regimes. North Korea has also called for a “one country, two-systems” type of reunification with South Korea.

The big question mark in Asia, though, remains China. The Chinese, with good historical reasons, hate chaos and anarchy and want a smooth transition. This will require compromise with the Western powers. The communist Chinese government also needs to shed its remaining xenophobia and reconcile itself with the Chinese diaspora.

It is time for countries like Russia, Canada and Japan, that have been historical bridges between East and West, to make sure we do not trade Fed tyranny for Chinese tyranny. Instead, we must negotiate a fair, meritocratic, multi-polar world system.

 

Source.