Omar Albach Video ‘Canadians React To Ottawa Shooting Racism’ – #RIPNathanCirilo

In this video, Omar Albach  shows how Canadians react to this “Islamic terrorist” nonsense. It was filmed in Hamilton, where Corporal Nathan Cirillo lived, and where I was born. When the mainstream media tells you Canadians are afraid of Islam or Muslims, remember this video. Hats off to Omar Albach! -LW

Things may have gotten a little too real for these YouTube filmmakers.

When York University student Omar Albach assembled his cast — a young man dressed in Muslim garb and another pretending to be a Muslim-hater — the idea was simple: to gauge how average Canadians felt about Islam in the wake of several high-profile incidents.

Over and over again, the Muslim character was heckled loudly by the other character and told he couldn’t get on the bus due to a terror threat.

And, over and over again, the young man’s efforts to get bystanders on the hate train met with failure. At every turn, the ‘hater’ was scolded, yelled at, shamed — at one point, a man said, “I’m sorry, but this is a friend of mine. I’m with him too.”

Finally, the actor took a punch in the face.

Canadians appeared to have no taste for the Islamaphobia he was peddling. What’s more striking perhaps is the setting Omar Albach, who is of Palestinian descent, chose for his social experiment — Hamilton, Ont.

That’s where the body of Nathan Cirillo was laid to rest this week in a moving ceremony that drew onlookers from across the country. The soldier was killed by a lone gunman while guarding the National War Memorial in Ottawa the week before. The suspected gunman, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, was quickly denounced by the prime minister as a terrorist.

One of the crew members, the young man pretending to hate on the ostensibly Muslim man, later identified himself as Devin Giamou.

It seems, he felt the need to join the YouTube comment fray to clear things up.

“I’m the guy that got punched in the video, I thought I would clarify a couple things,” he wrote in the video’s comment section. “I’m not actually a racist asshole like I portrayed in this video. I knew the guy who played the part of the ‘terrorist’ and he’s a cool guy who played his part very well.”

Responses to his clarification range from correction — “Islam is not a race” — to approbation — “Please keep doing thought-provoking videos like this.”

Posted on YouTube on Monday, the video has already been viewed more than 270,000 times. But this isn’t Albach’s first viral video. That distinction belongs to a video the 18-year-old produced in the summer, called “Hug A Terrorist.”

Source.

 

Italian Priest Commits Suicide after Pedophilia Accusation

The truth is coming out. Apparently, it was more than this man could handle. Maks Suard wrote a letter asking forgiveness from God, the Church, and the victim. Then, he hanged himself. May God have mercy on his soul. -LW


(Ria Novosti) MOSCOW, October 29 (RIA Novosti) – A Roman Catholic priest from the northern Italian province of Trieste committed suicide after being accused of child abuse, local media reported Wednesday.

Maks Suard, a 48-year-old priest, reportedly hanged himself after being accused of carrying out sexual abuse against a 13-year-old girl some 17 years ago.

According to the Messaggero Veneto newspaper, the priest had admitted his guilt and asked the Bishop of Trieste Giampaolo Crepaldi for two days to prepare a letter asking for forgiveness from God, the Church and the victim.

When Crepaldi arrived to officially divest Suard of his duties Tuesday afternoon, the priest was found hanging in the church sacristy, the newspaper reported.

Sources: Ria Novosti, The Event Chronicle

Attention! If your name appears on this list you can receive Spanish citizenship

Here’s a pretty good sign that things are changing at all levels of government. Spain seeks to remedy action taken as far back as 1492.  -LW


Spain’s government published a list of 5000 names and 220 Jewish name that will be recognized after more than 500 years of being excluded. Days ago, the Spanish parliament began an analysis to restore citizenship to the descendants of the Jews expelled in 1492.

Those who have these surnames prove whether or not living in Spain may obtain dual citizenship. “Those foreigners Sephardic proving that condition and its special link with our country, even without legal residence in Spain, whatever their ideology, religion or beliefs,” says Article 23 of the Civil Code.

See the list.

Bill Gates GMO Zombie Eggs Coming to a Whole Foods Market Near You?

The good news is that they’re not here, yet. The bad news is that Whole Foods could be among the first to sell them. -LW


A radical “artificial egg” backed by PayPal billionaire Peter Thiel and the “infamous” Bill Gates goes on sale in US supermarkets for the first time. Made from plants, it can replace eggs in everything from cakes to mayonnaise – without a chicken in the equation whatsoever. The “Bio-tech food mutation” team today have already started selling their “plant egg”! It looks like it will be first sold at none other than the beloved “Whole Foods” in California – and some say it could “soon be available in supermarkets worldwide.”

Full Article.

In Tuesday’s Sun: enough of the wannabe police, already

In Tuesday’s Sun: enough of the wannabe police, already | Warren Kinsella

Get this: in both of last week’s attacks in Canada, the politicians were announcing the deaths of Patrice Vincent and Nathan Cirillo, and labelling them as “terrorist” attacks ahead of any such police announcements. If this doesn’t lend itself to being considered as evidence of carefully planned events, I don’t know what does. -LW


Keeping church and state separate is important. Keeping the state and the police separate is equally important.

We all got to see why, last week, when Stephen Harper – and one of his senior ministers – summarily changed their job descriptions. Last Monday, the Prime Minister assigned himself the role of federal Chief of Police. Then, last Wednesday, Employment Minister Jason Kenney did likewise.

On Monday, as every Canadian will recall, Armed Forces warrant officer Patrice Vincent was assassinated in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu by an avowed ISIS sympathizer, a pathetic loser who does not deserve to be named.

Vincent’s murder became political fodder, and within minutes.

The parking lot where Vincent was killed was still a crime scene when the Prime Minister’s Office instructed a Conservative backbench MP to ask a puffball question about a “possible terror attack.” He did so, and used those words.

The Prime Minister of Canada stood up and told the Commons: “We are aware of these reports and they are obviously extremely troubling. First and foremost, our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families.” He then sat down.

All of this would be fine – it would almost be routine – were it not for one thing: Harper spoke about the killing before many hours before the police would do so.

An RCMP release would only come much, much later. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister’s Office deputized itself as the Mounties’ PR department, and issued a release that grandly elaborated on Harper’s statement in the Commons.

Two days later, yet more horror, and yet another Conservative politician elbowing aside the police. On that sad day, as all recall, Cpl. Nathan Cirillo was shot while he stood guard at the National War Memorial by another extremist.

The shooting took place before 10 a.m. Thereafter, an entire nation wondered for more than two agonizing hours about Cirillo’s status. Until just before 1 p.m., that is, when Jason Kenney – not police, not a hospital, not Cirillo’s family – announced that the soldier was dead.

“Condolences to family of the soldier killed, & prayers for the Parliamentary guard wounded,” Kenney’s tweet read. “Canada will not be terrorized or intimidated.”

All of which was true. Every word.

But this is true, too: politicians aren’t the police. They should always leave the investigation of crimes to the police. They should always adhere to their clearly-defined constitutional role, and keep their lips zipped about what the police do (and vice-versa).

Canadians should be profoundly uncomfortable, therefore, that any politician would be speaking about these tragedies – or assigning motive, or telling us a soldier has been murdered – long before the police. That is not the way our system works.

As every school kid knows, our Constitution stipulates that the executive, the legislative and the judicial branches must operate separately. It’s all right there, in black and white, in parts three, four and five.

Messrs. Harper and Kenney’s insistence on breaking the news about the deaths of Vincent and Cirillo was unconstitutional, full stop. It also raises the unattractive possibility that, one, Harper and Kenney were willing to reduce two soldier’s tragic deaths to political talking points. And, two, that the Conservatives are willing to usurp the role of the police, if they see any political advantage in doing so.

If that’s the case, then we are piloting through some very dangerous waters, indeed.

The constitutional obligation of any Minister, any Prime Minister, is to (a) let the police do what they do, without interference (b) ensure that we have peace, order and good government – by ensuring that public opinion isn’t needlessly inflamed (c) resist the temptation to politicize something that should never be political.

By all accounts, Vincent and Cirillo were good men, and good soldiers. They bravely did their jobs.

Harper and Kenney should do theirs, and leave police work to the police.

Source.

Coca-Cola Ordered to Shut Down for Draining Water & Polluting

In 2012, Bolivia kicked Coca-Cola out of the country. Now, India is ordering them to shut-down. Who will be next to give Coke the boot? -LW


Coca-Cola has been ordered to shut down operations in a city in India for using too much water and violating pollution laws, but the company seeks to keep business running as usual. Just like its heavy funding against the GMO labeling campaigns here in the U.S., Coca Cola is proving itself to be a corporate behemoth with no care whatsoever for its customers.

The groundwater level in Mehdiganj village has gone from safe to ‘over-exploited,’ and Coca-Cola doesn’t care if the village water supply runs completely dry. Villagers continue to protest as their wells dry up, all due to the Coke plant operating there. Farming sustainability and crop health is also suffering due to this irresponsible water use by Coca-Cola, but take no heed – they have some GMO seed from Monsanto they can recommend to you.

In the meantime, while villagers plead for their livelihoods, Coca-Cola has launched a massive campaign (sound familiar?) to grow their Coke-making plant to such a degree that it would increase their ground water usage by up to five times.

What’s worse – Coca Cola has been caught dumping pollution from their plants in economically depressed villages, and even trying to sell the toxic waste to unsuspecting farmers to be used as ‘fertilizer.’

A 60-year-old villager, Savriti Rai, was recently beaten almost to death for trying to protest Coca-Cola’s vile actions. After pressure from the community for over a decade and numerous violations of water-use and pollution laws, the government is finally trying to shut the plant down – and of course Coca-Cola is fighting it.

Add your voice to those who don’t want to see big corporations like this one rule the world with their domineering and mindless behavior any longer. Coca-cola has also shelled out millions of dollars to the anti-GMO labeling campaigns with secret contributions to the Grocery Manufacturing Association (GMA).

I wonder what other corporate secrets they are trying to hide. There are likely plenty, but these companies can’t keep us in the dark forever.

Additional Sources:

The Wire

 

Source.

Federal Reserve ends quantitative easing (QE3) bond-buying program

Finally! QE3 is over! I can almost hear the booming voice, “Step away from the money-printing machine!” Now  that QE3 is done, what’s next? Is this a sign of better things to come? Look at all of the distractions we’ve had in the last couple of days…  -LW


 

Federal Reserve Chairman Janet L. Yellen. (AFP Photo/Darren McCollester)

Federal Reserve Chairman Janet L. Yellen. (AFP Photo/Darren McCollester)The Federal Reserve has officially announced an end to its quantitative easing bond-buying program, but economists are split over whether the central bank’s decision will help or hinder post-recession recovery.

As expected, the Fed said Wednesday afternoon that it’s third and most recent round of quantitative easing, QE3, would come to an end.

“The Committee judges that there has been a substantial improvement in the outlook for the labor market since the inception of its current asset purchase program. Moreover, the Committee continues to see sufficient underlying strength in the broader economy to support ongoing progress toward maximum employment in a context of price stability. Accordingly, the Committee decided to conclude its asset purchase program this month,” reads part of a statement released by the Fed on Wednesday. “The Committee is maintaining its existing policy of reinvesting principal payments from its holdings of agency debt and agency mortgage-backed securities in agency mortgage-backed securities and of rolling over maturing Treasury securities at auction. This policy, by keeping the Committee’s holdings of longer-term securities at sizable levels, should help maintain accommodative financial conditions.”

The confirmation surprised few since the Fed was largely reported ahead of Wednesday’s decision to be considering making such an announcement. As far as what the result will be, however, is up for debate as economists weigh potential outcomes ranging from outright optimism to doom and gloom.

Combined, the three rounds of QE undertaken by the Fed since 2008 have generated trillions of dollars for the American economy through a process in which the central bank has perpetually pumped money into long-term government bonds and bonds backed by home mortgages. But David Wessel, the director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution, told NPR recently that the three-and-a-half-trillion dollars’ worth of bonds purchased during that six-year span has been “far more than anybody inside or outside the Fed expected when this all began.”

AFP Photo

AFP Photo

Indeed, the Fed has twice announced an end to its bond purchasing programs, only to soon after start again when it was realized that the desired effect failed to be achieved. Six years later, though, the end to QE3 might once and for all be the final nail in the program’s coffin.

In 2009, Ben Bernanke, then the chairman of the Fed, said that quantitative easing would only end “when credit markets and the economy have begun to recover,” at which point the central bank would resume business as usual.

“As the size of the balance sheet and the quantity of excess reserves in the system decline, the Federal Reserve will be able to return to its traditional means of making monetary policy–namely, by setting a target for the federal funds rate,” he said. “In considering whether to create or expand its programs, the Federal Reserve will carefully weigh the implications for the exit strategy. And we will take all necessary actions to ensure that the unwinding of our programs is accomplished smoothly and in a timely way, consistent with meeting our obligation to foster full employment and price stability.”

Today, the American economy is statistically sounder than six years ago: not only have three rounds of QE allowed faltering banks to get boost after boost from the government, but, partially as a result, jobless claims are down drastically from post-recession figures.

Nour Eldeen Al-Hammoury (Image from nourhammoury.com)

Nour Eldeen Al-Hammoury (Image from nourhammoury.com)

Nevertheless, optimism isn’t universal when it comes to what ending QE3 means for the world economy.

“Well there are some improvements, but we can’t say that it is recovering as everyone hoped,” Nour Eldeen Al-Hammoury, a chief market strategist at ADS securities in Abu Dhabi, told Euro News recently. “GDP is growing based on the inventories, which doesn’t mean that sales are increasing. The slack in the economy remains and so far there is no clear strategy on how this slack will be resolved. Moreover, the slowing down in Europe and Asia will be something to consider as the US economy is unlikely to grow on its own.”

According to Al-Hammoury, markets the world over may suffer as a result of ending QE3. “It is not the Middle East markets only, it is global markets and especially the emerging markets,” he said. “Let’s say, for example, Dubai — Dubai stock market was one of the best performers in the world. However, we will see some more declines at the end of the year. These markets are again sensitive to any events. However, these Middle East markets may benefit again from what’s happening in Europe. I mean the outflow that is happening in Europe and also don’t forget that this region has also opened its doors to foreign investors so with the Fed ending QE we might see some declines again, and if the global slowdown continues, global markets, including the Middle East, may continue with the current downside correction.”

Even in the west, that pessimism is present: Pedro Nicolaci da Costa wrote for The Wall Street Journal this week that the Fed may deploy another round of quantitative easing if the decision to end the third series proved to be unsuccessful, which, according to his report, may be the case.

“Many of the studies of large-scale asset purchases, known as quantitative easing or QE, agree they worked very well to prevent deflation and stabilize the financial system during the 2008 crisis, but disagree about how effective the programs have been in boosting growth since then,” da Costa wrote.

Although Bernanke has attributed QE with cutting unemployment, da Costa wrote, Fed researchers and academic economists have for years studied the practice and are split with regards to how successful the rounds have been, and what the eventual outcome will be when all is said and done.

“I do think they’re overly optimistic,” Barbara J. Cummings of the Boston Private Bank & Trust Company told CNBC this week. “The market and the Fed are definitely saying two different things. And the market is right. It usually is.”

To some, the outcome is even drearier. “Without another dose of stimulus, the US will likely slide into recession,” Worth Wray, chief strategist at Mauldin Economics, predicted to Equities earlier this month.
Source.